Course Catalog

T.I.G.E.R. Training has a catalog of over 330 courses, below you will find a partial listing of our current library.  T.I.G.E.R. Training can customize an existing class or create a new course to meet your company’s requirements and keep you in compliance.

ACCIDENT/ INCIDENT

Accident/Incident Investigation

Training goal

To focus on techniques for gathering complete, accurate and objective accident data used to arrive at true root causes and determine corrective action. To further examine and analyze data as a means of preventing injuries, property damage and financial losses.

Who should attend?

All levels of management, safety practitioners, safety committee members, and individuals responsible for investigating accidents (incidents).

You’ll learn to:

  • Employ effective investigation and interview techniques
  • Analyze accidents to identify “”true”” root causes
  • Describe human relations issues affecting accident reporting

 

Participants examine:

  • Incidents to investigate
  • On-site investigation process
  • Data to include in investigation reports
  • Witness interview techniques
  • Post action: hazard control measures and follow-up
  • 4hr Class focuses on the worker
  • 8hr Class focuses of the Supervisor and includes tabletop scenarios
Accident Prevention
Industrial injuries create a no-win situation for everyone involved.  Employees experience pain, suffering and incapacitation while the company suffers from the loss of the injured person’s contributions.  This training is designed to assist all personnel in assuring that such an undesirable situation will not develop in your company.  It provides information and guidance for the establishment and maintenance of an injury-free work environment.
Incident Investigation

BEHAVIOR-BASED SAFETY TRAINING

Behavior-Based Safety Training

Behavior-Based Safety (BBS) is the “application of science of behavior change to real world problems” or “A process that creates a safety partnership between management and employees that continually focuses people’s attentions and actions on theirs, and others, daily safety behavior.” BBS “focuses on what people do, analyzes why they do it, and then applies a research-supported intervention strategy to improve what people do”.  At its very core BBS is based on a larger scientific field called organizational behavior management.

 

BIOLOGICAL

Avian Flu H5N1
The goal of this training module is to familiarize users with the viral structure of avian influenza, global migration patterns of wild birds, major outbreaks of avian influenza in domestic poultry, transmission of avian influenza viruses from birds to other species, and clinical features of avian influenza in birds.
Bloodborne Pathogens (Exposure Control) Cleaners and Staff
The purpose of this course is to develop a Bloodborne Pathogens Exposure Plan for healthcare facilities using a step-by-step approach. Featured topics include an Introduction to Bloodborne Pathogens Standard, the Exposure Control Plan, Exposure Determination, Methods of Control, Vaccinations and Evaluations, Training and Information, and Record Keeping.
Bloodborne Pathogens (Exposure Control) Law Enforcement / Security Bloodborne Pathogens and Biological Safety Lab Personnel

OSHA Bloodborne Pathogens Standard (29 CFR 1910.1030 ) require that all employees who work with hazardous chemicals or potentially infectious biological agents attend hazard communication class. Personnel working with hazardous chemical agents are required to attend training class prior to working in the laboratory. Personnel working with biological agents are required to attend a training class within 30 days. In addition to providing useful information regarding exposure to hazardous substances and biological agents, the training classes offer very useful information regarding how to obtain SDS, how to dispose of hazardous wastes, and what to do in the event of an emergency.

Encephalitis Eastern Equine Encephalitis- Viral
Eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) is a rare but serious viral disease spread by mosquitoes that can affect people and horses. EEE can also cause disease in captive birds such as the ring-necked pheasant, emu, ostriches, quail and ducks. EEE infection and disease can occasionally occur in other livestock, deer, dogs, other mammals, reptiles and amphibians.

Course outline:

  • How to protect yourself
  • How does EEE spread
  • Symptoms of EEE
  • Treatment of EEE
  • EEE Prevention
      • Transmission
      • Symptoms
      • Prevention and Control
      • Personal Protective Equipment
Reporting Dead Birds Ebola and Infectious Disease Control
Infectious disease risks often pose a serious problem in the workplace.  From the Ebola outbreak to the seasonal flu, infectious diseases are responsible for worker illnesses, and in worse-case scenarios, death
H1N1 Swine Flu Infection Control

The purpose of this course is to develop a Bloodborne Pathogens Exposure Plan for individuals using a step-by-step approach

This Course will cover the following topics.

  • Introduction to Bloodborne Pathogens
  • Exposure Control Plan
  • Risks for Exposure
  • Exposure Determination
  • Methods of Control
  • Vaccinations and Evaluations
  • Reporting and Record Keeping
Lyme Disease
Mold Safety
This course will cover…

      • Mold Spores
      • Life Cycle of Mold
      • Routes of Entry into Indoor Environment
      • Harmful Effects
      • Symptoms of Mold Exposure
      • Dealing with Molds
West Nile Virus Safety
The West Nile virus (WNV) is most often spread to people from the bite of an infected mosquito. The WNV normally cycles between mosquitoes and birds. However, people may be infected if they are bitten by a WNV-infected mosquito.

Outdoor workers are at risk of WNV infection from the bite of infected mosquitoes. Workers at risk include farmers, foresters, landscapers, groundskeepers and gardeners, painters, roofers, pavers, construction workers, laborers, mechanics, and other outdoor workers. Entomologists, wildlife biologists, and other field workers are also at risk while working outdoors.

Laboratory, field, and clinical workers who perform necropsies of infected birds or handle WNV-infected tissues or fluids are also at risk of WNV infection if their skin is penetrated or cut. The virus can be transmitted through contact with the blood or other tissues of infected animals.

Workers at risk should receive training that describes and reinforces the potential occupational hazards and risks of WNV exposure and infection. The importance of the timely reporting of all workplace injuries and illnesses should be emphasized. A medical surveillance system should be in place which includes the reporting of symptoms consistent with WNV infection, laboratory incidents or accidents involving possible WNV exposures, and employee absenteeism.

FIRE

NFPA 2015 Training Programs (National Fire Protection Agency)
FIRE SUPPRESSION – NFPA 1670 – FIRE BRIGADE & FIRE RESCUE

Training is required to effectively utilize a fire suppression system. Participants will be trained to respond effectively to a fire using a fire extinguisher or built-in fire suppression system.

Key Requirements and Prerequisites

      • There are no prerequisites for the classes listed below
      • If you have fire extinguishers on site ALL employees must be trained to use them effectively
      • Remember train all your employees in fire extinguisher safety and use….it may save a life and property

FIRE SUPPRESSION AND SAFETY PROGRAMS

      • Fire Fighting Incipient Stage – LIVE BURN
      • Fire Suppression System Safety
      • Fire Extinguisher Safety

NFPA 1670 TRAINING

      • Call T.I.G.E.R. Training if you have an NFPA 1670 Training need.
      • NFPA 1670 8 Hour Confined Space Rescue Awareness
      • NFPA 1670 8 Hour Confined Space Rescue Operations
      • NFPA 1670 8 Hour Confined Space Technician

FIRE BRIGADE / FIRE RESCUE

      • Call T.I.G.E.R. Training if you have any Fire Brigade or Fire Rescue training needs
      • 24 hour Fire Brigade Operations
      • Fire Fighter Rescue and RIT (Rapid Intervention Team)

T.I.G.E.R. Training has a comprehensive array of OSHA Training programs to fit your regulatory training needs. T.I.G.E.R. Training is able to customize every OSHA Training program to effectively and safely communicate hazards to your employees, equip them with the appropriate tools to effectively and safely deal with a hazardous material spill, their equipment, or site hazards.

T.I.G.E.R. Training understands that as an environmental, health, and safety professional you need to have training that…protects your employees, reduces injuries, and protects the environment.

Excavation Competent Person Training
The following topics are covered in this Excavation Competent Person training course:
• Definitions of Key Terms Used in the OSHA Excavation Standards
• OSHA Requirements for a Competent Person
• General Hazards Associated with Trenching and Excavation Work
• Requirements for Locating and Working Near Underground Utilities (Federal and State)
• Dangers Associated with Water Accumulation
• Access and Egress from Trenches and Excavations
• Exposure to Vehicular Traffic
• Identifying and Addressing Potential Atmospheric Hazards Associated with Excavation Work
• Soil Testing and Classification
• Requirements for Protective Systems
o Sloping and Benching
o Shoring
o Trench Boxes
• Competent Person Inspection Requirements
• OSHA Directives and Interpretations Related to Trenching and Excavation
• OSHA Inspections at Excavation Sites
Fire Fighter Brigades (OSHA)
Fire Brigade Training is for anyone establishing a Fire Brigade at a facility for the purpose of fire fighting.
Fire Awareness (Workplace Hazards) Fire Behavior Fire Extinguisher Safety Training Incipient Stage Fire Fighting
The purpose of Fire Extinguisher training is to make employees aware of how fire extinguishers work. This training will help employees decide when to use a fire extinguisher and when they should not. With training, employees will learn what to do when they choose to use an extinguisher and will teach how to report a fire incident.

Course objectives:

      • Understanding the combustion process and different fire classes
      • Understanding fire extinguisher types, operating procedures, capabilities and limitations
      • Understanding basic firefighting concepts:         R.A.C.E.     P.A.S.S.

If live burn is requested: each attendee will participant in operating a fire extinguisher.

Fire Fighter-At Scene Traffic Safety Fire Fighter Incipient Stage (Live Burn) Fire Fighter Rescue (RIT Awareness) Fire Fighting Structural (Awareness) Fire Safety (General)
The goal of this Fire Safety Course is to provide a knowledgeable understanding on the origins of fires, sources of fires, how to protect yourself, and how to prevent fires from occurring.

Course Objective:

      • Three elements to fuel a fire
      • Four classes of fire
      • Preventing fires
      • Class of fire
      • Fire emergency preparedness
      • What to do in case of fire
      • Trapped in smoke or heat
      • After a fire emergency
      • BEFORE you consider fighting a fire
      • Multi-class ratings regarding fire extinguishers
      • Tips
      • Remember P-A-S-S
Fire Suppression Systems Fire Watch (Hotwork) Incipient Stage Fire Fighting National Firefighter Safety Stand Down NFPA 70E 2015 Arc Flash Arc Blast
Arc Flash/NFPA 70E Training Requirements – It’s an OSHA Law!

Employers are now legally required to provide their employees who have any exposure to electrical hazards (electrical workers or non-electrical workers exposed to electrical hazards) documented electrical safety training that includes much more than wearing rubber insulating gloves or avoiding damp or wet locations.

As a note: Electrical safety training for electrical workers is typically referred to as Qualified Electrical Worker Training, while electrical safety training for those who have incidental exposure to energized electrical equipment or circuits is referred to as Unqualified Worker Training (OSHA 29CFR 1910.331 (a).

A refresher is required every 3 years

HAZARDOUS WASTE EPA

Cell Bio Waste Streams Generic Clean Water Act Contingency Plans

Contingency Plan Outline

Contingency planning can be defined in a number of ways.

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) defines contingency planning as management policies and procedures designed to maintain or restore business operations, including computer operations, possibly at an alternate location, in the event of emergency, system failure, or disaster.

Contingency planning is one component of a much broader emergency preparedness process that includes items such as:

BUSINESS PRACTICES

OPERATIONAL CONTINUITY

DISASTER RECOVERY PLANNING

Damages Beyond Marine Life: Life-Long Impacts to Ecosystems (Awareness) Hazardous Substance Response Plan Regulations Hazardous Waste Management (RCRA)
Resource Conservation and Recovery Act training is for anyone who handles hazardous waste.

HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT

EPA – RCRA (Hazardous Waste Management) Training Programs

T.I.G.E.R. Training can help you with your hazardous waste management training needs. EPA requires individuals who handle hazardous wastes, enter the waste storage areas, or manage the satellite storage areas to have an initial RCRA training course prior to conducting their duties at generator site. An annual refresher is required to maintain compliance if the site is a LQG Large Quantity Generator.

Our training courses will educate your employees to properly understand hazardous wastes, labeling requirements, storage areas, satellite accumulation areas, common generator errors, and hazardous waste determination. The objective of this training is to provide certification (initial or annual) as required by the EPA under 40CFR for all employees that are affected by this regulation. Employees who should have the training are: Supervisors, Hazardous Waste Generators, Environmental Compliance Professionals, Waste Handlers, Facility Staff that may enter the hazardous waste storage area or handle hazardous waste in any amount, and Program Managers.

If you need to sign hazardous waste manifests DOT Training is needed, T.I.G.E.R. Training offers a duel certification program. The initial RCRA/DOT T.I.G.E.R. Training program can help you meet your training needs in approximately 2 days.

Benefits and Points to remember

  • These training courses will not satisfy Emergency Response Training under OSHA, Contingency Plan Training.
  • DOT training is covered in our RCRA/DOT Initial training program (see below)
  • Protect your company from unnecessary fines and citations
  • The program will be customized for the chemicals, wastes, plans, and procedures at your facility

RCRA Initial Training offers *TCH* 8 Hrs for Massachusetts Wastewater Lic holders.

Program Length: one day just RCRA, two days RCRA / DOT
This program is ideal for the new employee or someone who has never dealt with hazardous waste management. All required topics as dictated by 40 CFR 260-265 plus applicable state regulations will be covered.
Refresher: annually if LQG

RCRA Refresher Training

Program Length: One day
RCRA requires an annual refresher if you are a LQG Large Quantity Generator. This program will provide the appropriate review and certification for your employees who are impacted by the RCRA regulation.
Refresher Requirements: RCRA annually if LQG; DOT Every 3 years

RCRA-Resource Conservation and Recovery Act

HAZWASTE/RCRA

Module I
Introduction to Hazardous Waste Management

      • Background
      • Regulatory History
      • Federal Register and Code of Federal Regulations
      • Structure of the Regulations
      • State Environmental Agencies
      • DOT, OSHA and Other EPA Programs

Module II
Hazardous Waste Determination

      • Solid Waste Definition
        • Abandoned
        • Recycled
        • Inherently Waste-like
      • Hazardous Waste Definition
        • Listed Hazardous Wastes
        • Characteristic Hazardous Wastes
      • Exclusions and Exemptions
      • Mixture and Derived from Rule
      • Used Oil, Universal Waste & Mercury Containing Lights

Module III
Generator Status

      • Definition of LQG, SQG and CESQGs
      • Hazardous Waste Determination
      • Generator Determination
      • What Wastes Do You Count

Module IV
On-Site Management

      • EPA Identification Numbers
      • Permit for Onsite Treatment, Storage and Disposal
      • Accumulation
        • Satellite Accumulation
        • Containers and Tanks
      • Preparedness and Prevention
      • Contingency Plans and Emergency Procedures
      • Recordkeeping
      • Reporting Requirements
      • Spills

 

Module V
Record Keeping, Reporting, Spills, Training & Enforcement

      • RCRA Training
      • DOT Training
      • OSHA Training
      • Enforcement

Module VI
Off-Site Disposal

      • Hazardous Waste Manifests
      • Selecting a Proper Shipping Name
      • Transportation Requirements
        • Marking Requirements
        • Labeling Requirements
        • Placarding Requirements

Module VII
Used Oil, Universal Wastes and Mercury Containing Lamps

      • Overview of Used Oil
        • Rebuttable Presumption
        • Mixtures
        • Used Oil Specification
        • Used Oil Filters
      • Overview of Universal Waste
      • Mercury Containing Lights

Module VIII
Land Disposal Restrictions

      • LDR Determination
        • wastewaters
        • non-wastewaters
      • LDR Table
      • Notification / Certification
      • Universal Treatment Standards
SPCC- Spill Prevention Control Counter Measures Toxic Use Reduction Act (TURA) Universal Waste Training
Universal Wastes are certain hazardous wastes that are universally generated in large quantities by various facilities but present a limited hazard.

They are exempt from the hazardous waste regulations, but must still be managed separately from general trash.

Objectives:

You will be able to:

      • Identify the health and environmental hazards of universal wastes
      • Properly label, handle, and store universal wastes
      • Respond to emergencies

HAZMAT TRANSPORT

DOT HAZMAT Employee
DOT HAZMAT Employee Training is for anyone who ships HAZARDOUS Materials via ground.

General Awareness/Familiarization:

      • Introduction and Background
      • Rulemaking Procedures
      • Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Layout
      • Harmonization
      • Rules of Construction
      • Definitions and Abbreviations
      • Registration and Support
      • HMR Applicability
      • Enforcement (Part 107, Subpart D)
      • Training (Part 172, Subpart H)
      • Security Training (Part 172, Subpart I)

Identification:

      • Definitions: Hazardous Material (Hazmat), Hazardous Substance, Hazardous Waste, Marine Pollutant, Elevated Temperature Material
      • Determining: Hazard Class, Packing Group, Multiple Hazard Classes, Proper Shipping Name
      • 172.101 Hazardous Material Table (HMT) Columns

1 – 10 (Part 172, Subpart B)

Packaging:

      • Definitions
      • General Packing Requirements
      • Selecting Specification Packaging
      • Applicability, Responsibility, and Marking
      • UN Specification Packaging Tests
      • UN Specification Packaging Code
      • Qualification and Maintenance

Marking (Part 172, Subpart D):

      • “Common Sense” Markings Requirements
      • Non-Bulk and Bulk “Basic” Markings
      • Additional Marking Requirements

Labeling (Part 172, Subpart E):

      • General Labeling Requirements
      • Column 6 Label Codes
      • Subsidiary Hazard Labels Table
      • Prohibited and Duplicate Labeling
      • Label Specifications and Placement of Labels
      • Authorized Label Modifications
      • Exceptions From Labeling and CAO

Shipping Papers (Part 172, Subpart C):

      • General Information: General Entries, Continuation Page, Date and Retention, Shipper and Receiver Name and Address, Number and Type of Packages, Quantity, and Certification and Signature
      • Basic Description: UN Number, Proper Shipping Name, Hazard Class, Subsidiary Hazard Class, Packing Group
      • Additional Information Required
      • Emergency Response Information (Part 172, Subpart G)

Placarding (Part 172, Subpart F):

      • Applicability and Responsibility
      • Prohibited and Permissive Placarding
      • General Placarding Requirements: Table 1 and Table 2
      • Subsidiary Placarding and Dangerous Placard
      • Placard Specifications and Visibility and Display

Segregation:

      • Segregation Tables
      • Subsidiary Hazards
      • Load Securement

Special and Unique Moves:

      • Small Quantities
      • Empty Packagings
      • Overpacks
      • Salvage Packagings (Drums)
      • Hazmat Samples
      • Limited Quantity and Consumer Commodity
      • Materials of Trade

Safety:

      • Responsibility
      • Emergency Response Guidebook
      • Emergency Response
      • Verbal and Written Notification

Test:

      • Take Test
      • Review Test
DOT Drug & Alcohol

The DOT Delivery Driver safety Training is designed for Short Haul Delivery Drivers.  The training will focus on

Driver awareness training and safety training.  Drivers taking the training will trained to understand the proper

Procedures for transportation safety, including what to do during an emergency, what if a breakdown occurs, how to lift and move both heavy and bulky items.  The training will also include driver awareness of external risks, such as dangerous neighborhoods, theft, and basic security.

General Awareness/Familiarization:

  • Introduction and Background
  • DOT Introduction
  • Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Layout
  • Defensive driving for Commercial Drivers
  • Drug & Alcohol effects & fines
  • Unsafe Neighborhoods Driver Awareness
  • Driver Route Restrictions
  • Back Safety Lifting Safety

 

Test

DOT Reasonable Suspicion Drug Testing DOT Security (HAZMAT TRANSPORTATION)
DOT Transportation Security Training

You must develop and implement a security plan if you offer for transportation or transport the following types or quantities of hazmat. “Large bulk quantity” refers to a quantity greater than 3,000 kg., (6,614 lbs.,) for solids or 3,000 liters (792 gal.,) for liquids and gases in a single packaging such as a cargo tank motor vehicle, portable tank, tank car, or other bulk container:

• Any quantity of a Division 1.1, 1.2, or 1.3 material;

• A quantity of a Division 1.4, 1.5, or 1.6 material requiring placarding in accordance with Subpart F of Part 172 of the HMR;

• A large bulk quantity of Division 2.1 material;

• A large bulk quantity of Division 2.2 material with a subsidiary hazard of 5.1;

• Any quantity of a material poisonous by inhalation as defined in §171.8 of this subchapter;

• A large bulk quantity of a Class 3 material meeting the criteria for Packing Group I or II;

• A quantity of a desensitized explosive meeting the definition of a Division 4.1 or Class 3 material requiring placarding in accordance with Subpart F of Part 172 of the HMR;

• A large bulk quantity of a Division 4.2 material meeting the criteria for Packing Group I or II;

• A quantity of a Division 4.3 material requiring placarding in accordance with Subpart F of Part 172 of the HMR;

 Training

Each hazmat employee of a person/company required to have a security plan, who handles, performs a regulated function related to, or implements the security plan, must receive in-depth training that provides an awareness of the security risks associated with hazmat transportation and methods to enhance transportation security. This training should cover the following topics:

• Company security objectives;

• Organizational security structure;

• Specific security procedures, duties, and responsibilities for each employee;

• Specifics on how to recognize and respond to possible security threats; and

• Specific actions to be taken by each employee in the event of a security breach.

E85 Fuel Training IATA International Air Transportation Association
IATA International Air Transportation Association Training is for anyone who ships Hazardous Materials / Dangerous Goods by air.

Course Objectives:

      • After successful completion of this training module, students will understand:
      • Identify the requirements IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations (DGR) for air consignments.
      • Determine suitable packaging type for dangerous goods packed cargo consignments.
      • Become familiar with State and Carrier Variations.
      • Follow the principles of segregation.
      • Determine quantity limitations of dangerous goods offered for transport by air.
      • Compute the calculation of Quantity Values.
      • Select the correct dangerous goods documentation and marking requirements for air consignments.

Prerequisites:

Students MUST have completed a DOT Hazmat Transportation Training Course under 49 CFR 172.704 (HM 181,

126F or 215 A-B) BEFORE taking this course. A copy of a certificate showing training within the last 3 years or

successful completion of the course with Compliance Solutions is required.

Topics:

      • Classification Requirements
      • State and Operator Variations
      • Packaging
      • Placarding, Labeling and Marking
      • Documentation
      • Loading and Segregation
IMDG International Maritime Dangerous Goods
International Maritime Dangerous Goods Training is for anyone who ships Hazardous Materials / Dangerous Goods by sea.IMDG Outline
1. Introduction
o The IMDG code
o Dangerous goods introduction
o IMDG code layout
o Revision cycle
2. Part 1: General Provisions, Definitions, and Training
o General provisions
o Definitions, units of measurement, and abbreviations
o Training
o Shore based personnel
o Security provisions
o Radioactive materials
3. Part 2: Classification
o Class 1 Explosives
o Class 2 Gases
o Class 3 Flammable liquids
o Class 4 Flammable solids; Substances liable to spontaneous combustion; Substances which, in contact with water, emit flammable gases
o Class 5 Oxidizing substances and organic peroxides
o Class 6 Toxic and infectious substances
o Class 7 Radioactive materials
o Class 8 Corrosives
o Class 9 Miscellaneous dangerous goods
o Marine pollutants
o Packing Groups I, II, and III
4. Part 3: Dangers Goods List, Special Provisions, and Exceptions
o UN Numbers and Proper Shipping Names
o Single entries
o Generic entries for well defined groups of substances and articles
o Specific Not Otherwise Specified entries covering a group of substances and articles of a particular chemical or technical nature
o General N.O.S. entries covering a group of substances and articles that meet the criteria of one or more classes
o Reading the Dangerous Goods List
o Special provisions
o Limited Quantities
o Excepted Quantities
5. Part 4: Packing and Tank Provisions
o Packagings
o Intermediate Bulk Containers (IBCs)
o Large packagings
o Portable tanks
o Multiple Element Gas Containers (MEGCs)
o Bulk containers
6. Part 5: Consignment Procedures
o Authorization of consignments and advanced notifications
o Marking
o Labeling
o Documentation
o Placarding
o Overpacks
o Salvage
o Cargo Transport Units
7. Part 6: Construction and Testing of Packagings, Intermediate Bulk Containers (IBC), Large Packagings, Portable Tanks, Multiple-Element Gas Containers (MEGCs) and Road Tank Vehicles
o Packaging codes
o UN specification markings
8. Part 7: Provisions Concerning Transport Operations
o Stowage provisions
o Spillages or leakages
o Handling provisions
o Segregation
o Dealing with incidents
Truck Driver Training Awareness

INDUSTRIAL TRUCK TRAINING OUTLINE

Overview of the program

Goal of the program: to provide a training program based on the trainee’s prior knowledge, the types of vehicles used in the workplace, and the hazards of the workplace.

Course will utilize video, group discussion and hands-on practice. Each operator must obtain the knowledge and skills needed to do their job correctly and safely.

 Types, Features, and Physics

Familiarize each operator with the basic types and functions of powered industrial trucks.

Develop an understanding of the information shown on a data plate.

Understand the critical truck measurements that affect safety.

Understand the forces that cause tipovers, and the truck design considerations and safety ratings that help prevent them, including the “stability triangle.”

Inspecting the vehicle

Understand the purpose and importance of pre-operational checkouts.

Provide a basic understanding of areas covered during a pre-operational checkout.

Familiarize each operator with a checklist for pre-operational checkouts, and what to do if a problem is discovered.

Driving the Truck

Understand the elements of safe movement of a powered industrial truck.

Understand the differences between an automobile and a powered industrial truck.

Recognize the safety hazards associated with operating a powered industrial.

Load Handling

Understand the elements of load lifting safety.

Understand the safe operating procedures for raising and lowering loads in aisles.

LPG for Lift Trucks

Discuss LPG and its properties.

Understand the elements and procedures of safely refueling internal combustion vehicles.

Describe tank components: service valve, surge valve, relief valve, etc.

Discuss related safety issues.

Battery and Charging

Understand the elements and procedures of safely changing and charging batteries.

Discuss filling procedures and maintenance.

Discuss related safety issues.

Safety Concerns

Review/reinforce potential of serious injury

Review/reinforce safety procedures in your facility.

Specific Truck and Workplace Training/Hands-On

Review features of specific PIT’s to be operated.

Review operating procedures of specific PIT’s to be operated.

Review safety concerns of specific PIT’s to be operated.

Review workplace conditions and safety concerns of areas where PIT’s will be operated.

Learn/practice actual operation of specific PIT’s to be operated and specific workplace conditions where PIT’s will be operated.

Demonstrate proficiency performing the powered industrial truck operator duties specific to the trainee’s position and workplace conditions.

Certification of Completion of the Course

Radioactive Materials Receipt and Shipment General Awareness

HAZWOPER AND EMERGENCY RESPONSE

HAZWOPER 4 Hour First Responder Awareness
First Responder Awareness *TCH*

Program Length: one-half day
Defensive action against a spill might be more than you want your employees to do. The First Responder Awareness program will educate your employees how to safely gather information about a spill that they may encounter, and implement your Emergency Response Plan. This course covers broad issues pertaining to the hazard recognition at work sites. OSHA has developed the HAZWOPER program to protect the workers working at hazardous sites and devised extensive regulations to ensure their safety and health. This course, while identifying different types of hazards, also suggests possible precautions and protective measures to reduce or eliminate hazards at the work place.

Course Overview
This Course will focus on the following topics:
•Regulation Overview
•Site Characterization
•Hazard Recognition
•Site Control

Refresher: Annually

F.R.A. Level I Employee Training is for anyone who is tasked with chemical spill recognition and awareness during emergency responses.

HAZWOPER 8 Hour First Responder Operations (FROPS)
First Responder Operations *TCH*

Program Length: one 8 hour day
If you do not want to actively respond to a spill, a defensive stance is what you may prefer for yourself and your employees. The First Responder Operations Program will prepare participants to take action to mitigate a spill from a safe distance.
Refresher: Annually

F.R.O.P.S. Level II Employee Training is for anyone who is tasked with chemical spill recognition and defensive actions during emergency responses.First Responder Operations
Schedule:

The course is divided into three sections with the following objectives:

Section 1: Understanding Hazardous Materials
• Recognize the specific laws and regulations that protect fire fighters
• Name at least five different substances that are classified as
• hazardous materials
• Identify four categories of sites where hazardous materials may be
• found
• Relate incident location to type and quantity of hazardous materials
• present
• Identify some of the hazards involved with specific sites
• Apply the APIE process to the management of hazardous materials
• incidents
• Recognize and apply chemical and physical properties
• Describe the routes through which hazardous materials may enter
• the body
• Describe toxic effects of exposure
• Identify hazards that could be associated with an incident involving
• criminal or terrorist activity
• Identify locations which may be criminal or terrorist targets

Section 2: Recognizing Hazardous Materials
• Identify the purpose of medical surveillance
• Identify the five basic hazardous materials identification clues
• Apply knowledge of container shape and size to predict products
• carried in highway and rail tank cars
• Use NFPA 704M, HMIS, DOT, and military marking systems to
• identify the presence of hazardous materials
• Use the Emergency Response Guidebook to identify hazardous
• materials

Section 3: Responding to Hazardous Materials
• Use shipping papers and facility documents to identify hazardous
• materials
• Use the NIOSH Pocket Guide as a reference tool on chemical
• Products

HAZWOPER 24 Hour Emergency Response Operations TSDF Operations HAZWOPER 24 Hour Emergency Responder
24 Hour Hazardous Material Technician *TCH* 8 Hours

Program Length: 3 – 8 hour days
If you have the potential of responding to hazardous material spills at your facility and are using an “in-house” team to do so, this program will prepare your responders to properly, effectively, and safely respond to the spill
Refresher: Annually – Emergency Response Refresher

E.R. Level III Employee Training is for anyone who is tasked with chemical spill recognition and defensive and offensive actions during emergency responses.

Annual Emergency Response Refresher *TCH* 8 Hours

Program Length: one day
Prerequisite: 24 Hour Hazardous Material Technician
This program will satisfy the annual refresher requirement for the 24 hour HMT. Programs will be customized for your facility and can be classroom based, table top, or a “live” scenario.
Refresher: Annually

HAZWOPER Hazardous Materials Specialists
H.M.S. Level IV Employee Training is for anyone who is tasked with chemical spill recognition and defensive and offensive actions during emergency responses, who is tasked with verification of site remediation, and has expertise in emergency response plans both local and regional.
HAZWOPER 40 Hour Hazardous Materials Technician
40 Hour HAZWOPER (Hazardous Waste Site Operations) 29 CFR 1910.120 *TCH*

Program Length: 5 – 8 hour days or 4 – 10 hour days
Do you work at a listed site? If so this is the program for you. If you don’t know what a listed site is…You probably don’t need this program, however, if a government agency has “listed” a site or you work on listed properties then the 40 Hour HAZWOPER is required to be completed before you work on such a site.
Refresher: Annually – Satisfied by the 8 Hour HAZWOPER Refresher

H.M.T. Level III Employee Training is for anyone who is tasked with chemical spill recognition and defensive and offensive actions during emergency responses, and who is tasked with verification of site remediation.

HAZWOPER 8 Hour Emergency Response Refresher (8 TCH WWT )
8 Hour HAZWOPER Refresher *TCH* 8 Hours

The purpose of this program is to satisfy the annual training requirements for emergency response personnel.  Students will be trained in the proper techniques to control, contain and clean up an uncontrolled release or a spill of a hazardous material.

 

Enrollment is open to those who have already completed the 24-hour HAZWOPER training.

Agenda:

Ø  Registration & IntroductionØ  Regulation OverviewØ  Chemical Hazard/Hazards CommunicationØ  Toxicology & Air MonitoringØ  PPE / DeconØ  Respiratory Protection with fit testØ  Emergency Response Procedures

Ø  Incident Command System

Ø  Site Control

Ø  Spill Control

Ø  Offensive Action in Emergency Response

Ø  Practical Exercise

Training will include Powerpoint presentation, handouts, exam and certificates  (will provide 8 WW TCH’s if required)

Program Length: one-8 Hour Day

Refresher: Annually

ALOHA
ALOHA (Areal Locations of Hazardous Atmospheres) is a program designed to model chemical releases for emergency responders and planners. It can estimate how a toxic cloud might disperse after a chemical release and also features several fires and explosions scenarios.
ALOHA displays its estimate as a threat zone, which is an area where a hazard (such as toxicity, flammability, thermal radiation, or damaging overpressure) has exceeded a user-specified Level of Concern (LOC).
With the help of ALOHA, you can calculate how quickly chemicals are escaping from tanks, puddles (on both land and water), and gas pipelines and predict how that release rate changes over time.
ALOHA allows you to model many release scenarios: toxic gas clouds, BLEVEs (Boiling Liquid Expanding Vapor Explosions), jet fires, vapor cloud explosions, and pool fires. Depending on the release scenario, ALOHA evaluates the corresponding type of hazard.

ALOHA is developed jointly by NOAA and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

Chlorine Safety/Response
The course explains the hazards of and what precautions to take when handling, storing and using chlorine.  Chlorine is a powerful disinfectant and bleaching agent. In both gas and liquid forms, chlorine is a toxic substance that presents a number of hazards. If proper precautions are not taken while working with or around pure chlorine, serious injury or even death can result.

This course will cover the following:

      • What is Chlorine
      • Hazards of Chlorine
      • Employer Responsibilities
      • Examples of safe work procedures
      • Preparing for emergencies
      • Investigating incidents
      • Working safely around chlorine
      • Preventing and controlling exposure
      • First aid
Chlorine Ton Cylinder Response
Among the major uses of chlorine gas and its compounds is the disinfection of public drinking water supplies, swimming pools, and treatment of sewage. In industry, chlorine is used to treat industrial wastewater and as a raw material in the manufacture of many types of chemicals and finished products such as plastic. But as useful as chlorine is, it can also be quite deadly. It was used as a chemical weapon in World War I and was found to be more effective than bullets. The majority of accidents, injuries, and deaths that occur from unprotected and uncontrolled exposure to chlorine occur because safe handling procedures were not followed.

BASIC INFORMATION ABOUT CHLORINE IN THE MSDS 

• The MSDS explains the hazards of and what precautions to take when handling, storing and using chlorine.

• The chemical symbol for chlorine is Cl or Cl2. At room temperature, chlorine is a greenish-yellow gas, and an amber color as a liquid.

• Chlorine is heavier than air – an important point to remember in the event of a leak.

• Chlorine monitoring instruments must be capable of taking measurements near the floor.

• Cl2 reacts with water to form hypochlorous acid and must be isolated from water until proper mixing can occur. Make sure piping is dry before admitting chlorine. Use only dry, oil-free air for purging; never use water to test for chlorine leaks.

• Chlorine is non-flammable but reacts violently with some chemicals.

• Frostbite occurs if chlorine liquid is splashed on the skin. If chlorine gas is swallowed, severe burns to the mouth, throat and stomach will be expected. Serious burns to eyes are also potential hazards.

• Cl2 reacts violently with oil and grease creating spontaneous combustion.

• Chlorine expands very rapidly.

CAMEO Computer aided Management of Emergency Operations
  Both beginner and advanced training for any responder looking to use one of the most advanced HAZMAT Response Management Software programs. CAMEO is a system of software applications used widely to plan for and respond to chemical emergencies. It is one of the tools developed by EPA’s Chemical Emergency Preparedness and Prevention Office (CEPPO) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Office of Response and Restoration (NOAA), to assist front-line chemical emergency planners and responders. They can use CAMEO to access, store, and evaluate information critical for developing emergency plans. In addition, CAMEO supports regulatory compliance by helping users meet the chemical inventory reporting requirements of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA, also known as SARA Title III). CAMEO also can be used with a separate software application called LandView to display EPA environmental databases and demographic/economic information to support analysis of environmental justice issues.
Cadmium Training Chromium Community Emergency Response Team (CERT)
The Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) Program educates people about disaster preparedness for hazards that may impact their area and trains them in basic disaster response skills, such as fire safety, light search and rescue, team organization, and disaster medical operations. Using the training learned in the classroom and during exercises, CERT members can assist others in their neighborhood or workplace following an event when professional responders are not immediately available to help. CERT members also are encouraged to support emergency response agencies by taking a more active role in emergency preparedness projects in their community.
Decon Training (HAZMAT Operations) Decontamination (Personnel/Equipment Decontamination Principles and Patient Management (MEDICAL) Emergency Operations Center (EOC)
Course Overview

This course describes the role, design, and functions of Emergency Operations Centers and their relationships as components of a multi-agency coordination system. The course contains disaster-related examples, activities and case studies that relate to EOC’s and multi-agency coordination systems at the local, state and federal levels of government.

Course Objectives:

At the end of the course, students should be able to:

      • Relate EOC operations to National Incident Management System (NIMS) requirements.
      • Describe the role that EOCs play in overall multiagency coordination.
      • Describe the relationship between the EOC and the on-scene Incident Command System (ICS) structure.
      • Identify staffing, information, systems, and equipment needs at the EOC.
      • Determine whether participants’ EOC organizations are conducive to effective coordination.
      • Identify potential alternate locations suitable for EOC operations should the primary EOC facility become damaged or inoperable.
      • Create a test, training and exercise plan for critical EOC operations.
      • Develop a strategy and schedule for reviewing EOC resource requirements and technology needs.
Emergency Response Plan

Emergencies and disasters can occur any time without warning. The more you are prepared for them, the better you will be able to act, minimizing panic and confusion when an emergency occurs. Relatively speaking, small businesses may have more to lose than large companies when a disaster — natural or otherwise — strikes. Because of high costs or lack of resources, many smaller companies have less rigorous business-continuity plans in place, and some have no formal processes at all. The purpose of this bulletin is to help employers develop emergency response plans that will meet the specific needs of their small businesses. Your plan should take into account the type of business you are in and the nature of your worksite.

 

Topics will cover:

How well prepared is your business now?

What procedures do you already have in place for an emergency situation?

What potential emergency situations could occur?

Planning will include…

  • Individual roles and responsibilities
  • Potential threats, hazards, and protective actions
  • Notification, warning, and communications procedures
  • How to locate family members in an emergency
  • Emergency response procedures
  • Evacuation, shelter, and accountability procedures
  • Location and use of common emergency equipment
Emergency Response (Petroleum Industry) Emergency Response (Tanker Truck Incidents) OSHA-Hexavalent Chromium Regulation

OSHA Hexavalent Chromium Regulation

INTRODUCTION

Hexavalent chromium is essential to a number of industrial applications: chromate pigments are used in dyes, ink and plastics, chromic acid is used in chrome plating and chromates are used to prevent corrosion in paints and other coatings. While these compounds can be very beneficial, they can also be harmful or lethal to those employees exposed to them. This program discusses the safe work practices these workers must follow to avoid exposures to this hazardous substance.

Topics include characteristics and properties of hexavalent chromium, effects of exposures, engineering and work practice controls, medical surveillance, the respiratory protection program, protective clothing and equipment, proper housekeeping and responding to exposures.

 

Training may include:

 

 

  • CHARACTERISTICS & PROPERTIES OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM
  • EFFECTS OF INHALATION
  • EFFECTS OF SKIN EXPOSURES
  • OTHER EXPOSURES
  • OSHA’S HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM STANDARD
  • ENGINEERING &WORK PRACTICE CONTROLS
  • EXPOSURE ASSESSMENTS
  • MEDICAL SURVEILLANCE
  • THE RESPIRATORY PROTECTION PROGRAM
  • PROTECTIVE CLOTHING & EQUIPMENT
  • SAFE REMOVAL OF CONTAMINATED CLOTHING
  • REGULATED AREAS
  • RESPONDING TO EXPOSURES
Waste Site Operations

HOUSEKEEPING

5-S
5S is a technique that results in a well-organized workplace complete with visual controls and order. It’s an environment that has “a place for everything and everything in its place, when you need it”.
Walking Working Surfaces

INCIDENT OPERATIONS COMMAND

Incident Command Awareness

The ICS is a management system designed to enable effective and efficient domestic incident management by integrating a combination of facilities, equipment, personnel, procedures, and communications operating within a common organizational structure, designed to enable effective and efficient domestic incident management. A basic premise of ICS is that it is widely applicable. It is used to organize both near-term and long-term field-level operations for a broad spectrum of emergencies, from small to complex incidents, both natural and manmade. ICS is used by all levels of government—Federal, State, local, and tribal—as well as by many private-sector and nongovernmental organizations. ICS is also applicable across disciplines. It is normally structured to facilitate activities in five major functional areas: command, operations, planning, logistics, and finance and administration.

Course may include:

  • Know and be able to implement the employers Incident Command System.
  • Know how to employ emergency response plan
  • Know and understand the hazards and risks associated with the employees working in chemical protective clothing.
  • Know how to implement the local emergency response plan
  • Know and understand the importance of decontamination procedures

Duration of training: 8 Hours

Training will include: PPT presentation, handouts and certificates

Incident Commander
I.C. Level V Employee Training is for anyone who is tasked with running emergency response operations.
Incident Command ICS100

ICS 100, Introduction to the Incident Command System, introduces the Incident Command System (ICS) and provides the foundation for higher level ICS training. This course describes the history, features and principles, and organizational structure of the Incident Command System. It also explains the relationship between ICS and the National Incident Management System (NIMS). ICS is used by all levels of government—Federal, State, local, and tribal—as well as by many private-sector and nongovernmental organizations. ICS is also applicable across disciplines. It is normally structured to facilitate activities in five major functional areas: command, operations, planning, logistics, and finance and administration.

Primary Audience:

Persons involved with emergency planning, response or recovery efforts.

Course may include:

  • Know and be able to implement the employers Incident Command System.
  • Know how to employ emergency response plan
  • Know and understand the hazards and risks associated with the employees working in chemical protective clothing.
  • Know how to implement the local emergency response plan
  • Know and understand the importance of decontamination procedures
  • Tabletop scenarios using the command structure (customer based scenarios)
Incident Command ICS200

The ICS is a management system designed to enable effective and efficient domestic incident management by integrating a combination of facilities, equipment, personnel, procedures, and communications operating within a common organizational structure, designed to enable effective and efficient domestic incident management. A basic premise of ICS is that it is widely applicable. It is used to organize both near-term and long-term field-level operations for a broad spectrum of emergencies, from small to complex incidents, both natural and manmade.

 

Audience: First line supervisors, single resource leaders, lead dispatchers, field supervisors, company officers and entry level positions (trainees) on Incident Management Teams and other emergency personnel that require a higher level of Incident Command System training

 

Course may cover:

  • Leadership and Management
  • Delegation of Authority and Management Objectives
  • Function Areas and Positions
  • Briefings
  • Organizational Flexibility
  • Transfer of command
Incident Command ICS300

The ICS is a management system designed to enable effective and efficient domestic incident management by integrating a combination of facilities, equipment, personnel, procedures, and communications operating within a common organizational structure, designed to enable effective and efficient domestic incident management. A basic premise of ICS is that it is widely applicable. It is used to organize both near-term and long-term field-level operations for a broad spectrum of emergencies, from small to complex incidents, both natural and manmade.

 

Audience: Middle management, strike team leaders, task force leaders, unit leaders, division/group supervisors, branch directors and Multi-Agency Coordination System/Emergency Operations Center staff.

 

Course may cover:

  • ICS Fundamentals Review
  • Unified Command
  • Incident/Event Assessment and Agency Guidance in establishing Incident Objectives
  • Planning Process
  • Demobilization, Transfer of Command and Close-out

 

Incident Command ICS400

 

The ICS is a management system designed to enable effective and efficient domestic incident management by integrating a combination of facilities, equipment, personnel, procedures, and communications operating within a common organizational structure, designed to enable effective and efficient domestic incident management. A basic premise of ICS is that it is widely applicable. It is used to organize both near-term and long-term field-level operations for a broad spectrum of emergencies, from small to complex incidents, both natural and manmade.

Audience: Command and general staff, agency administrators, department heads, emergency managers, areas commander and Multi-Agency Coordination System/Emergency Operations Center managers.

 

Course Objectives:

  • ICS Fundamentals Review for Command and General Staff
  • Major and/or Complex Incident/Event Management
  • Area Command
  • Multi-Agency Coordination
Mercury Safety/Clean up

 

The purpose of this program is to provide participants with the skills necessary to properly decontaminate a Mercury spill area. Students will be able to size up a Mercury spill, use a Mercury spill kit properly, select the appropriate PPE for dealing with the spill, and the types of monitoring devices used for Mercury spills.

All participants must be trained in Respiratory Protection prior to Mercury Spill clean-up.

NIMS 700
National Incident Management System Employee Training is for anyone who is tasked with running emergency response operations and set a strong foundation in Incident Communications.  This lesson will describe the key concepts and principles of NIMS, and the benefits of using the system for domestic incident response. At the end of this lesson, you should be able to describe these key concepts, principles, and benefits. NIMS training will also provide the groundwork for ICS 100 Training (Incident Command System).

What Is NIMS? 

NIMS is a comprehensive, national approach to incident management  that is applicable at all jurisdictional levels and across functional disciplines, this includes all corporate entities.

The intent of NIMS is to

      • Be applicable across a full spectrum of potential incidents and hazard

scenarios, regardless of size or complexity.

      • Improve coordination and cooperation between public and private entities in a

variety of domestic incident management activities.

NIMS provides a consistent nationwide template to enable all government, private-sector, and nongovernmental organizations to work together during any emergency incidents.

CAMEO Computer aided Management of Emergency Operations
Both beginner and advanced training for any responder looking to use one of the most advanced HAZMAT Response Management Software programs.

INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE

Air Sampling Chemical Hygiene-Lab Safety
This 4 hour program will cover basic concepts established under the protocols of industrial hygiene and hygienic chemical practices. The course is intended for students and workers who work with and potentially be exposed to chemicals in a laboratory or general industrial setting.

This complies with OSHA standard 29CFR1910.1450

      • Lab Safety Basic
      • Fume Hood Operations
      • BL (1, 2, 3, 4) Lab Levels
      • Chemical Storage Segregation
      • Incidental Spill Cleanup
      • Chemical Exposure Control
      • Safety Shower Usage
      • Eye Wash Station Usage
      • Monitoring
      • Chemical Hygiene Program Elements
Mold Safety
This course will cover…

      • Mold Spores
      • Life Cycle of Mold
      • Routes of Entry into Indoor Environment
      • Harmful Effects
      • Symptoms of Mold Exposure

Dealing with Molds

Noise Monitoring Air Monitoring with Emphasis on Direct Reading Real Time Monitors Toxicology Awareness & Monitoring
This 4 hour training program is intended to provide toxicology awareness and monitoring. The intention of this program is to provide employees with a basic understanding of toxicological hazards posed by chemicals in the workplace. How to recognize toxicological hazards; how to mitigate toxicological hazards and respond to toxicological hazards.

This complies with 29CFR1910.1200

Topics to be covered:

      • Toxicology Basics
      • Chemical classification
      • OSHA Hazcom Standard GHS
      • OSHA & NIOSH Exposure levels
      • Signs Symptoms of Over Exposure

MARITIME

Boat Operations Marine Environment
Training will include Boating Operations, Boom Deployment and Rules of the Road.  The purpose of this program is to provide the students with the skills necessary to handle maneuver and place water containment boom correctly, and effectively.  This course will also teach basic boating skills, navigational skills, basic maneuvering under the limited maneuverability rules of the road

The program will be customized to include training topics specific to employee job function, marine equipment, and body of water where operations will take place.

Training may include…

•             Boating Safety (Basic)

•             Boat Handling

•             Emergency Procedures

•             Man Overboard

•             Rules of the Road as per USCG

•             Towing Boom

•             Towing Sister Vessel

•             Proper Vessel Lighting

•             Night Operations

•             Boom Launching

•             Vessel in Distress Protocols

•             Limited maneuverability rules and Operations

•             Anchoring

•             Boom Placement

•             Boom Watch

•             Spill Drill Exercise

Boat & Boom Hazardous Materials
BOOM DEPLOYMENT TRAINING PROGRAM

This training provides designated responders with practical skills that can be used to respond to a hazardous material release on waterways. The training will consist of defensive command, control, and containment actions taken by responders to protect life and mitigate the effects of a hazardous materials release on property and the environment.

Boating Safety-Waterborne HAZMAT Spills Non Petroleum Boating Safety Marine Operations
BOATING SAFETY / GENERAL MARINE SAFETY

Ensure that your employees are safe while conducting their job function on vessels that are on waterways. Call T.I.G.E.R. Training to assist with updating your marine training methods.

Coastal Ocean Spill Response Cold Water Rescue Cold Weather Safety
Cold stress is a dangerous situation that faces workers that perform their job duties in an area poorly insulated or without heat. Whenever temperatures drop decidedly below normal and as wind speed increases, heat can rapidly

While working leave your body. These weather-related conditions may lead to serious health problems. in extreme weather, special precautions should be considered in order to keep workers warm and productive. This course will give your employees the knowledge on how to stay warm and reduce the risk of cold-related injuries and sickness.

Topics covered:

      • Methods of Heat Loss
      • Cold Weather Injuries
      • Snow Blindness
      • Dehydration
      • Injury Prevention Tips
      • Shelter
      • Cold Weather Sleep Tips
      • Cold Weather Uniform
      • Sustaining Performance
      • Cold Weather Survival Kit
Life Jacket/Basic Water Rescue

This Basic Water Rescue course provides individuals with the knowledge and skills necessary to prevent, recognize and respond to many types of aquatic emergencies. Each Course is designed to fit the specific needs of your students.

Course Objective:

      • Life jackets
      • Throwing and reaching equipment
      • Knots
      • Entrapment Rescues
      • Recognize the behaviors of someone who needs help in the water
      • Importance of an emergency action plan
      • Understand the effects of STRESS and PRESSURE
      • Cold water emergencies
      • Self-Rescue
      • Drowning
Marine Chemical Spill Massachusetts Oil Spill Prevention and Response Act OPA 90 (Oil Pollution Act) OPA 90 (QI) Qualified Individual) Shoreline Spill Response

MEDICAL

AED/CPR/First Aid
Scope: This American Heart course covers all the basics of First Aid and Adult CPR, along with use of AED devices, and meets OSHA requirements. CPR is taught according to the current American Heart Association guidelines

 

Course Curriculum

·       First Aid, Good Samaritan laws, EMS System, Standards of Care

·       Recognizing and Responding to Emergencies, Avoiding Infectious Diseases

·       Basic Life Support: Rescue Breathing, Choking, CPR, AED

·       Bleeding & Wound Care, Shock, Burns

·       Head, Spinal, Chest, & Abdominal Injuries

·       Bone, Joint & Muscle Injuries

·       Sudden Illness: Cardiac, Stroke, Respiratory, Seizures, Diabetes

·       Poisonings, Bites & Stings

·       Heat, Cold, & Environmental Emergencies

·       Rescuing & Moving Victims

·       Hands-on exercises

 

Test: A multiple-choice test is administered at the conclusion of the program.

Course Completion Certificate: First Aid CPR/AED is valid for 2 years.

Back Safety/Safe Lifting

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, more than one million workers suffer back injuries each year, and back injuries account for one of every five workplace injuries or illnesses. Further, one-fourth of all compensation indemnity claims involve back injuries, costing employers billions of dollars. These figures do not begin to reflect the pain and suffering employees experience as a result of their injuries.

This training course will cover…

      • Common causes of back injury/pain
      • Back anatomy
      • Spinal balance
      • Posture
      • Safe body mechanics
      • Principles of levers
      • Techniques for safe lifting
      • Two person loads
      • Loading truck or shelf
      • Awkward loads
      • Repetitive lifting
      • Exercise
Boat Crew First Aid Training Chair Car/ Lift Safety
The purpose of the Chair Car / Lift Safety course is to prepare each student to perform daily activities in the safest manor possible. This course is designed to help drivers learn the procedures of wheelchair securement, lift operation and discusses the common mistakes drivers make. Through unique, hands on interactions, this training offers scenarios in which each student learns the procedures of boarding and securing passengers. Participants will practice each procedure until they get it right. Such interactions help them understand the procedures, identify their mistakes and recognize the importance of Safety.
Cold Weather Safety
Cold stress is a dangerous situation that faces workers that perform their job duties in an area poorly insulated or without heat. Whenever temperatures drop decidedly below normal and as wind speed increases, heat can rapidly

While working leave your body. These weather-related conditions may lead to serious health problems. in extreme weather, special precautions should be considered in order to keep workers warm and productive. This course will give your employees the knowledge on how to stay warm and reduce the risk of cold-related injuries and sickness.

Topics covered:

      • Methods of Heat Loss
      • Cold Weather Injuries
      • Snow Blindness
      • Dehydration
      • Injury Prevention Tips
      • Shelter
      • Cold Weather Sleep Tips
      • Cold Weather Uniform
      • Sustaining Performance
      • Cold Weather Survival Kit
Ebola and Infectious Disease Control
Infectious disease risks often pose a serious problem in the workplace. From the Ebola outbreak to the seasonal flu, infectious diseases are responsible for worker illnesses, and in worse-case scenarios, death.  Course topics will include:

      • Transmission
      • Symptoms
      • Prevention and Control
      • Personal Protective Equipment
Ergonomics Training

This topic covers ergonomics, or the science of fitting a job to the worker performing that job. Ergonomic hazards include repetitive stress injuries, carpal tunnel syndrome, and other musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs).

The goal of ergonomics is to reduce a worker’s exposure to MSD risk factors by changing the design of a workstation or the way a job is performed, allowing workers to rotate through different jobs, or providing personal protective equipment (PPE). Although there is currently no specific OSHA standard for ergonomics, employers have a duty to address ergonomic issues under the General Duty Clause of the Occupational Safety and Health Act.

 

Extreme Heat: Personal Health and Safety First Aid

This course can be customized for. Course topics may include but not limited to the follow…

      • General Safety Guidelines
      • Calling for assistance
      • Conducting a head to toe survey
      • Cuts
      • Identify types of external bleeding and how to control bleeding
      • Burns involving dry heat, wet heat, electricity and chemicals
      • Infection Prevention
      • Choking
      • Electrical Safety
      • Hazardous Chemicals
      • Fires
      • Concussion, skull fracture, cerebral compression and spinal injury
      • Eye injuries
      • Anaphylaxis
      • Major illnesses including heart attack, stroke, epilepsy, asthma and diabetes
      • Recognize shock and how to manage an individual who is in shock
      • Administer first aid to an individual who is unconscious (including seizure)
      • Reporting Incidents
      • Exam
Healthcare Provider PPE
Personal Protective Equipment and Hygiene training is important because the proper use of specialized clothing, work accessories and hand washing can prevent injuries and exposure in the workplace. It is important for employers to be committed to establishing proper safety practices and providing a safe work environment.
The goal of this course is to help employers reduce their employees’ exposure to workplace hazards and protect them from serious injury or illness by learning how to properly use Personal Protective Equipment (PPE).
Course objectives:

      • Introduction and Definition of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
      • Hazard Assessment
      • Personal Protective Equipment Selection
      • Elements of proper PPE training
      • Primary types of PPE:
      • Eye and Face Protection
      • Head Protection
      • Hand Protection
      • Foot Protection
      • Protective Clothing
      • Your company’s policies on PPE use in the workplace
      • Hand washing technique
      • Proper selection of an antibacterial
      • Quiz
Hepatitis A,B,C Hepatitis A,B,C,D,E,F,G,H HIV / AIDS Hospital Preparedness for Mass Casualty Disasters Psychological First Aid Recommended Procedures for Sample Collection Preservation and Shipping H5N1

OSHA OUTREACH TRAINING

10 Hour OSHA Construction
10 | 30 Hour OSHA Construction Safety

The OSHA Construction Safety Training program is a comprehensive safety program for anyone involved in the construction industry. Safety Directors, foremen, and field supervisors will benefit most from this program as it provides information on OSHA compliance issues. Constructions workers are required to have additional training covering specific hazards when they are on site.

This training program is intended to provide entry level construction workers information about their rights, employer responsibilities, and how to file a complaint as well as how to identify, abate, avoid and prevent job related hazards on a construction site. The training covers a variety of construction safety and health hazards which a worker may encounter at a construction site.  Mandatory 2 day class per OSHA.

10 Hour OSHA General Industry
10 Hour OSHA General Industry

T.I.G.E.R. Training Corp.’s 10-Hour General Industry course is an OSHA-Authorized training course that provides relevant safety material to help workers stay safe on the job.  When you successfully complete the OSHA 10-Hour General Industry course, you will receive a valid U.S. Department of Labor OSHA 10 Card.

This program trains workers and employers on recognition, avoidance, abatement and prevention of safety and health hazards in workplaces. It also includes information regarding workers’ rights, employer responsibilities and how to file a complaint.

While anyone can take this online OSHA 10 General Industry course, it is specifically designed for:

      • Workmen
      • Foremen
      • Job Supervisors
      • Inspectors involved in General Industry activities

Course objectives:

      • Walking and Working Surfaces
      • Exit Routes
      • Emergency Action Plans
      • Fire Prevention Plans
      • Electrical Safety
      • Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
      • Hazard Communication
      • Hazardous Materials
      • Materials Handling
      • Machine Guarding
      • Safety and Health Programs
      • Ergonomics
      • Leading Cultural Change
30 Hour OSHA Construction
10 | 30 Hour OSHA Construction Safety

The OSHA Construction Safety Training program is a comprehensive safety program for anyone involved in the construction industry. Safety Directors, foremen, and field supervisors will benefit most from this program as it provides information on OSHA compliance issues. Constructions workers are required to have additional training covering specific hazards when they are on site.

The 30-hour Construction Outreach Training Program is intended to provide a variety of training to workers with some safety responsibility. Training will emphasize hazard identification, avoidance, control and prevention.

30 Hour OSHA General Industry
30 Hour OSHA General Industry

 OSHA 30-hour training is the primary method used to train workers and supervisors on hazard recognition and OSHA safety standards. OSHA training is necessary for a safe and healthy work environment. Workers and supervisors taking this course have jobs related to health care, electrical, factory, warehouse, manufacturing, storage and more. This 30-hour course covers general industry hazards not specific to those working construction-only jobs. If you need your OSHA 30-hour card and currently fall into the general industry category, this course is right for you.

This 30-hour course teaches safety awareness and helps each worker recognize and reduce the risks of job site hazards. Our interactive training is intended as a comprehensive overview of OSHA standards and the safety and health hazards workers may face on the job site. This course places special emphasis on hazard identification, avoidance, control and prevention. When the training is completed, you will receive your official OSHA 30-hour training card and certificate.

Course objectives:

•Introduction to OSHA

•OSHA record keeping

•Walking and working surfaces

•Safety orientation

•Fire safety

•Forklift safety

•Hot work permit

•Electrical safety

•Electrical safety: shockproof – unqualified

•Personal protective equipment (PPE)

•Hearing safety

•Hazard communication

In addition, 10 hours of electives from at least five of these areas are required:

•Flammable and combustible liquids— Subpart H

•Personal protective equipment (PPE)— Subpart I

•Permit-required confined spaces— Subpart J

•Lockout/tagout— Subpart J

•Machine guarding — Subpart O

•Welding, cutting and brazing — Subpart Q

•Introduction to industrial hygiene, bloodborne pathogens— Subpart Z

•Ergonomics

•Safety and health programs.

MASSACHUSETTS HOISTING LICENSE PREP AND RE-CERTIFICATION

Hoisting License 1A, 1B, 1C, 1D Training
Hoisting License 1A/1B/1C/1D Training 

The DPS regulations dictate that employees who operate certain types of equipment receive training and certification on that equipment.  The 1A / 1B / 1C / 1D Hoisting Engineer Training covers items needed to pass the state exam and to cover refresher CEU’s (Continuing Education Units) for those who already possess the above mentioned hoisting engineer classification.

Course Agenda:

  • Massachusetts / OSHA
  • Mass General Law 146
  • 520 Code of Massachusetts Regulations 6.00
  • 520 Code of Massachusetts Regulations 14.00
  • OSHA 29CFR 1926
  • OSHA 29CFR 1910
  • ANSI B30
  • Massachusetts General Law 82 sec,40
  • Massachusetts General Law 82A
  • Massachusetts General Law 164 sec,76D
Hoisting License 1A, 1B, 1C, 1D Train-the-Trainer
Hoisting License 1A, 1B, 1C, 1D Train-the-Trainer

The DPS regulations dictate that employees who operate certain types of equipment receive training and certification on that equipment.  The 1A, 1B, 1C, 1D Hoisting Engineer Training covers items needed to pass the state exam and to cover refresher CEU’s (Continuing Education Units) for those who already possess the above mentioned hoisting engineer classification.

Course Agenda:

  • Massachusetts / OSHA
  • Mass General Law 146
  • Code of Massachusetts Regulations 6.00
  • Code of Massachusetts Regulations 14.00
  • OSHA 29CFR 1926
  • OSHA 29CFR 1910
  • ANSI B30
  • Massachusetts General Law 82 sec,40
  • Massachusetts General Law 82A
  • Massachusetts General Law 164 sec,76D

Materials included for state submission and approval:

  • Complete course booklet
  • Complete power point presentation
  • Complete and state compliant certificate of completion
  • State compliant identification card with hoisting engineer restrictions
  • Additional supplemental handouts ie; driving course diagrams, mock tests for state exam, driver skill checklist
Hoisting License 3A Training
Hoisting License 3A (Tower/Electric) Training

The DPS regulations dictate that employees who operate certain types of equipment receive training and certification on that equipment.  The 3A (Tower/Electric) Hoisting Engineer Training covers items needed to pass the state exam.  This is an approved DPS program authorized to issue 4 CEU’s, where applicable.

Course Agenda:

  • Massachusetts / OSHA
  • Mass General Law 146
  • 520 Code of Massachusetts Regulations 6.00
  • OSHA 29CFR 1926
  • OSHA 29CFR 1910
  • ANSI B30
Hoisting License 4A Training
Hoisting License 4A (Specialty) Training

The DPS regulations dictate that employees who operate certain types of equipment receive training and certification on that equipment.  The 4A (Specialty) Hoisting Trainig covers the items needed to pass the state exam.  The 4A Class overs Drill Rigs, Pipeline Side Booms, Concrete Pumps, Catch Basin Cleaner, Sign Hanging Equipment, and Specialty Lawn Mower.

Hoisting License 2A, 2B, 2C, 2D Training
Hoisting License 2A, 2B, 2C, 2D Training

The DPS regulations dictate that employees who operate certain types of equipment receive training and certification on that equipment.  The 2A, 2B, 2C, 2D Hoisting Engineer Training covers items needed to pass the state exam and to cover refresher CEU’s (Continuing Education Units) for those who already possess the above mentioned hoisting engineer classification.

Course Agenda:

  • Massachusetts / OSHA
  • Mass General Law 146
  • 520 Code of Massachusetts Regulations 6.00
  • 520 Code of Massachusetts Regulations 14.00
  • OSHA 29CFR 1926
  • Massachusetts General Law 82 sec,40
  • Massachusetts General Law 82A
  • Massachusetts General Law 164 sec,76D
  • 220 Code of Massachusetts Regulations 99.00 (Dig Safe)
Hoisting License 2A, 2B, 2C, 2D Train-the-Trainer
Hoisting License 2A, 2B, 2C, 2D / Train-the-Trainer

The DPS regulations dictate that employees who operate certain types of equipment receive training and certification on that equipment.  The 2A Hoisting Engineer Training covers items needed to pass the state exam and to cover refresher CEU’s (Continuing Education Units) for those who already possess the above mentioned hoisting engineer classification.

Course Agenda

  • Massachusetts / OSHA
  • Mass General Law 146
  • Code of Massachusetts Regulations 6.00
  • Code of Massachusetts Regulations 14.00
  • OSHA 29CFR 1926
  • Massachusetts General Law 82 sec,40
  • Massachusetts General Law 82A
  • Massachusetts General Law 164 sec,76D
  • Code of Massachusetts Regulations 99.00 (Dig Safe)

Materials included for state submission and approval:

  • Complete course booklet
  • Complete power point presentation
  • Complete and state compliant certificate of completion
  • State compliant identification card with hoisting engineer restrictions
  • Additional supplemental handouts ie; driving course diagrams, mock tests for state exam, driver skill checklist

 

RESCUE

C.S.E.R. Confined Space Entry Rescue (OSHA 29 CFR 1910.146(k)/Confined Space NFPA 1670 - OSHA 29 CFR 1910.147)
C.S.E.R. Training is for any employees performing rescue from confined spaces in the event that professional rescue is unavailable or not trained in confined space technical rescue.

Our Rescue Confined Space Training Program offers comprehensive coverage of OSHA 29 CFR 1910.146 and meets all applicable training (including ANSI and NFPA) standards. In the classroom, the course introduces the student to the requirements of entry procedures as stated in the OSHA regulation. The classroom exercises emphasize the human element of the confined space equation and cover authorized entrant and attendant duties and the practical development of a Confined Space Rescue Team.

OSHA 29 CFR 1910.146(k)/Confined Space NFPA 1670 – OSHA 29 CFR 1910.147                                                                              

      • Size-up of existing and potential conditions
      • Initiation of contact and establishment of communications with Victims where possible
      • Recognition and identification of the hazards associated with non-entry confined space emergencies
      • Recognition of confined spaces
      • Procedures to perform a non-entry retrieval
      • Procedures for implementing the emergency response system for confined space emergencies
      • Procedures for implementing site control and scene management
      • Procedures for protecting personnel from hazards within the confined space
      • Procedures for assuring that personnel are capable of appropriately
      • Managing the physical and psychological challenges that effect rescuers entering confined spaces
      • Identification of the duties of the rescue entrant(s) and back-up rescue entrant(s), rescue attendant, and rescue team leader as defined herein
      • Procedures to monitor continuously, or at frequent intervals,  the atmosphere in all parts of the space to be entered and to monitor for, in the following order, oxygen con-tent, flammability (LEL/ LFL), and toxicity
      • Procedures for entry-type rescues into confined spaces
      • Procedures for the safe and effective use of victim packaging devices that could be employed in confined space rescue
      • Procedures for the transfer of victim information including location, surroundings, condition when found, present condition, and other information pertinent to emergency medical services
      • Procedures for planning and implementing an appropriate confined space rescue operation
      • Procedures to assure that rescue team members shall take part in a medical surveillance program
      • Planning response for entry-type confined space rescues in hazardous environments Implementation of the planned response.
Extrication Rescue Life Jacket/Basic Water Rescue

This Basic Water Rescue course provides individuals with the knowledge and skills necessary to prevent, recognize and respond to many types of aquatic emergencies. Each Course is designed to fit the specific needs of your students.

Course Objective:

      • Life jackets
      • Throwing and reaching equipment
      • Knots
      • Entrapment Rescues
      • Recognize the behaviors of someone who needs help in the water
      • Importance of an emergency action plan
      • Understand the effects of STRESS and PRESSURE
      • Cold water emergencies
      • Self-Rescue
      • Drowning
High Angle Rescue Roof Rescue Rope Rescue Search and Rescue Operations Technical Rope Rescue
T.R.R. Training is taught to any rescuers wanting to expand their abilities to perform technical rescues from height.
Vehicle Rescue Water Rescue White Water Rescue

SECURITY

Active Shooter/Workplace Safety
The Active Shooter / Workplace Safety Training Course is designed to better plan for workplace violence.

Training…

      • Adopting the survival mindset during times of crisis
      • Discuss the involvement of the law enforcement and what to expect upon arrival
      • Prepare you to know what YOU should/shouldn’t do
      • Explain what you should report ie;  number of suspects, physical features, race, etc.
      • Help recognize sounds of gunshots
      • Reacting quickly when gunshots are heard and/or when a shooting is witnessed
      • Evacuating the area
      • Hiding out
      • Include mock active shooter training exercises
Workplace Violence Prevention
This course will cover the following:

      • Identify the risk factors
      • What actions to take when approached with violence
      • De-escalating techniques
      • Causes of stress at work
      • Prevention Strategies
      • Warning signs of escalating behavior
      • Workplace weapons policy
Workplace Safety and Security
This course will cover the following:

      • Employee Site Safety and Security
      • Securing Vehicles
      • Working in high risk Neighborhoods
      • Employee Emergency Response Plans
      • Accidents involving company vehicles and Employees
      • Company property management and theft
      • Incident Reporting
Biological & Chemical Threats in the Workplace Canine Search Specialist-Teams (Awareness) Chemical Facility Security Training

This 4 hour program will cover basic concepts established under the protocols of industrial hygiene and hygienic chemical practices. The course is intended for students and workers who work with and potentially be exposed to chemicals in a laboratory or general industrial setting.

This complies with OSHA standard 29CFR1910.1450

 

  • Lab Safety Basic
  • Fume Hood Operations
  • BL (1, 2, 3, 4) Lab Levels
  • Chemical Storage Segregation
  • Incidental Spill Cleanup
  • Chemical Exposure Control
  • Safety Shower Usage
  • Eye Wash Station Usage
  • Monitoring
  • Chemical Hygiene Program Elements
Community Emergency Response Team Training (CERT)
The Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) Program educates people about disaster preparedness for hazards that may impact their area and trains them in basic disaster response skills, such as fire safety, light search and rescue, team organization, and disaster medical operations. Using the training learned in the classroom and during exercises, CERT members can assist others in their neighborhood or workplace following an event when professional responders are not immediately available to help. CERT members also are encouraged to support emergency response agencies by taking a more active role in emergency preparedness projects in their community.
COOP (Continuity of Operation) Custodial Safety
This course will cover…

• Safety Orientation • Injuries on the Job

• Chemical Hazards • Planning for Emergencies

• Electrical Hazards • Robberies and Assaults

• Ergonomic Hazards • Slips and Falls

Safety Data Sheets

Disaster Response Electrical Grid (Security)

 

  • This training addresses electrical safety requirements that are necessary for the practical safeguarding of employees in their workplaces and is divided into four major divisions as follows:
  • Design safety standards for electrical systems. These regulations are contained in 1910.302 through 1910.330. Sections 1910.302 through 1910.308 contain design safety standards for electric utilization systems. Included in this category are all electric equipment and installations used to provide electric power and light for employee workplaces. Sections 1910.309 through 1910.330 are reserved for possible future design safety standards for other electrical systems.
  • Safety-related work practices. These regulations will be contained in 1910.331 through 1910.360.
  • Safety-related maintenance requirements. These regulations will be contained in 1910.361 through 1910.380.
  • Safety requirements for special equipment. These regulations will be contained in 1910.381 through 1910.398.
Emergency Operations Center Training (EOC)
Emergency Operations Center (EOC)

Course Overview

This course describes the role, design, and functions of Emergency Operations Centers and their relationships as components of a multi-agency coordination system. The course contains disaster-related examples, activities and case studies that relate to EOC’s and multi-agency coordination systems at the local, state and federal levels of government.

Course Objectives:

At the end of the course, students should be able to:

      • Relate EOC operations to National Incident Management System (NIMS) requirements.
      • Describe the role that EOCs play in overall multiagency coordination.
      • Describe the relationship between the EOC and the on-scene Incident Command System (ICS) structure.
      • Identify staffing, information, systems, and equipment needs at the EOC.
      • Determine whether participants’ EOC organizations are conducive to effective coordination.
      • Identify potential alternate locations suitable for EOC operations should the primary EOC facility become damaged or inoperable.
      • Create a test, training and exercise plan for critical EOC operations.
      • Develop a strategy and schedule for reviewing EOC resource requirements and technology needs.
Evacuation Safety (OSHA)
This training will help small, low-hazard service or retail business implement an emergency action plan, and comply with OSHA’s emergency standards.

Course objectives:

      • Do I need Emergency an Action Plan (EAP)?
      • What is an EAP?
      • How do I write my own EAP?
      • How do I evaluate my workplace to comply with OSHA’s emergency standards?
      • Where can I get additional assistance?
Facility Security (General Awareness)

This course provides guidance to individuals and organizations on how to improve the security in your workplace. No workplace—be it an office building, construction site, factory floor, or retail store—is immune from security threats.

Employees are often the target of these threats as well as the organization’s first line of defense against them. Threats endanger the confidentiality, integrity, and security of your workplace, as well as your virtual workplace and computer systems. This course presents information on how employees can contribute to your organization’s security.

 

 

Course Objectives:

Upon completing this course, the participant will be able to:

 

  • Types of Security Breaches
  • Security Risks Inside & Outside
  • Identify potential risks to workplace security Levels.
  • Describe measures for improving workplace security.
  • Determine the actions to take in response to a security situation

 

Land Navigation /Tracking Security Awareness Security Plans Theatre Safety Terrorism and Community Emergency Response Team Training
Transportation Security Weapons of Mass Destruction

GENERAL SAFETY

Aerial Lift Safety
(29 CFR 1910.67) Aerial lifts are vehicle-mounted, boom-supported aerial platforms, such as cherry pickers or bucket trucks, used to access utility lines and other above ground job-sites. The major causes of fatalities are falls, electrocutions, and collapses or tip overs. Employers must take measures to ensure the safe use of aerial lifts by their workers if they are required to use this equipment in the course of their employment.  The aerial lift truck, more commonly called a bucket truck, is by far the most complex form of aerial lift device. OSHA has developed its own standards for aerial lift truck operation. You may be thinking that operating a bucket truck is simple: All you have to do is jump in the bucket, hit a few switches, and you’re there. But sometimes just getting a bucket truck to the work area is a job in itself. A small bucket truck weighs 10,000 pounds and cannot stop on a dime. This is why bucket trucks are notorious for hitting other vehicles in rear-impact accidents. They are also known for getting stuck in off-road situations, especially in wet conditions. In addition, bucket trucks have poor rear visibility and should not be backed up unless the driver finds it absolutely necessary and has a spotter. In short, no one should work in a bucket truck without proper training. Operating a bucket truck requires specific qualifications, which include instruction in the following operations:

      • Proper work area set-up
      • Performing an inspection
      • Understanding hydraulics
      • Correct use of fall arrest equipment
      • Boom operation
      • Maintain proper clearances
      • Emergency procedures
Arc Flash Arc Blast (NFPA)

1) OSHA Rules & Regulations Under 29CFR1910 Subpart S (General Industry) & 29CFR1926 Subpart K (Construction Standard) and the NFPA 2015 Arc Flash Arc Blast Standards

 

2) Training

  1. a) Identifying Hazards
  2. b) Job Briefings,
  3. c) Live Work Defined
  4. d) Live Work Permits

 

3) Working on/Near Exposed Energized Parts

  1. a) Minimum Approach Distance Protective Action Zones (New Zones 2015)
  2. b) Insulation of Equipment Electrical Connections, (No Exception of New NEC 2014)
  3. c) Apparel APF, PPE (New Levels for 2015)
  4. d) NFPA 70E in Relation to OSHA Lockout Tagout 29CFR1910.147

 

4) Arc Flash Awareness & Guidelines De-energizing

  1. a) Equipment Grounding
  2. b) Testing Electrical Equipment
  3. c) Guarding
  4. d) Special Conditions

 

5) Electrical Diagnostic Testing Exemptions (NFPA Work Permit Needed or Not)

 

6) Trouble Shooting Electrical Systems

Asbestos Awareness
Do you have asbestos in your building? If so, then you MUST give the employees in the building who work with or may disturb asbestos with the proper training. OSHA regulations require your maintenance and janitorial workers to take a two (2) hour asbestos awareness class.  Asbestos is a highly useful material, but its attendant risks and dangers are as high as well.  Take the heat out of asbestos-related dangers with this course. It introduces facts on asbestos use and discusses OSHA’s Asbestos.

The three forms of asbestos

      • Adverse health effects
      • Where asbestos can be found
      • Hazard communication
      • Personal protection
      • Housekeeping requirements
Basic Electrical Safety
This training addresses electrical safety requirements that are necessary for the practical safeguarding of employees in their workplaces and is divided into four major divisions as follows:

      • Design safety standards for electrical systems. These regulations are contained in 1910.302 through 1910.330. Sections 1910.302 through 1910.308 contain design safety standards for electric utilization systems. Included in this category are all electric equipment and installations used to provide electric power and light for employee workplaces. Sections 1910.309 through 1910.330 are reserved for possible future design safety standards for other electrical systems.
      • Safety-related work practices. These regulations will be contained in 1910.331 through 1910.360.
      • Safety-related maintenance requirements. These regulations will be contained in 1910.361 through 1910.380.
      • Safety requirements for special equipment. These regulations will be contained in 1910.381 through 1910.398.
Battery Safety
When you complete this training, you will understand the overall design and function of today’s batteries. In addition, you will be able to identify maintenance practices you can perform to keep them ready for service.

      • Identify the parts of a voltaic cell.
      • Explain the distinction between a cell and a battery.
      • Describe the electrochemical action associated with cells and batteries.
      • Compare the discharge and charge processes.
      • Identify ways to increase battery voltage and capacity.
      • Define amp-hours.
      • Explain the main difference between a primary and a secondary cell.
      • Describe how specific gravity affects cell voltage.
      • Discuss types of battery charging methods.
      • List safety precautions needed when testing or working with batteries.
      • Using Batteries Safely
      • Disposing of Batteries

Learning to use batteries safely is important to all of us, in our portable electronic world. Battery knowledge comes in handy in both personal and work situations, and is knowledge that everyone can use.

California OSHA (CAL-OSHA) Compressed Gas Cylinder Safety Confined Space Entry Operations CSEO
Confined Space Entry Operations is for anyone entering Permit Required Confined Spaces.
Confined Space Entry

The Confined Space Entry training course provided by TIGER Training Corp. will allow the entrant, entry attendant, or permit supervisor to safely and confidently understand and evaluate the hazards and procedures associated with confined spaces. This training will help you to differentiate between a Permit-Required confined space and a Non-Permit Required

confined space. The course will address the hazards associated with confined spaces and it will outline the duties and responsibilities of all members of a confined space entry team, emergency rescue procedures, and plan development. In addition to confined space entry procedures and hazards, this course will discuss the need for appropriate personal protective equipment and the selection characteristics for each level of protection.

 

 

 

This course may cover the following:

  • Introduction
  • Definitions of confined spaces
  • Permit-required confined spaces
  • Non Permit-required confined spaces
  • Accident statistics, case studies
  • Permit-required confined space entry policies and procedures
  • Alternate entry procedures for confined spaces
  • Definitions and descriptions of hazardous atmospheres
  • Confined space signs and labeling
  • Identifying hazards associated with confined space entry
  • How to complete a confined space entry permit and hot-work permit
  • Equipment used for confined space entry, including PPE, ventilators, atmospheric
  • Rules governing outside contractors
  • Responsibilities of the entrant, attendant and the supervisor

 

Duration of training: 6 Hours

Training will include PPT Presentation, handouts and certificates (will provide 6 WW TCH’s if required)

Confined Space Entry Rescue

The participants will familiarize themselves with the hazards associated with Confined Spaces Entry Operations so that they will be better prepared to perform a non-entry rescue, if one were needed.

 

 

Agenda may include:

 

 

  • Registration & Introduction
  • Confined Spaces
  • Confined Space Hazards
  • Mitigating Confined space Hazards
  • Confined Space Videos
  • Hazard Control
  • Monitoring Confined Spaces
  • Non-Entry Rescue
  • Practical Exercise
  • Exam
  • Personal Protective Equipment

 

 

 

 

 

 

Duration of training: 6 Hours

Training will include PPT Presentation, handouts and certificates (will provide 6 WW TCH’s if required)

Contractor Safety
  • Incident reporting and investigation
  • Accident prevention signs and tags
  • Hand safety
  • Back injury prevention
  • Behavioral safety
  • First aid/CPR/AED
  • Confined Space
  • Lockout/Tagout
  • Drug and Alcohol
  • Hazcom
  • Electrical Safety (non-qualified)
  • Intervention (training)
  • H2S Awareness (if working in a sour gas area)
  • Fire prevention and portable fire extinguishers
  • Walking working surfaces
  • Job Safety and Environmental Analysis
  • Personal Protective Equipment, Respiratory
  • Prevention of workplace violence
  • Fall protection: introduction
  • Permitting
  • Onshore/Offshore orientation and emergency evacuation
  • Environmental
  • Excavation – trenching and shoring
  • Occupational Health

 

Crane Safety/Hand Signals

This Course will cover the Following Material:

  • Proper crane setup
  • Jobsite safety
  • Crane component recognition
  • Introduction to Hydraulic Theory
  • Mathematical load weight and load bearing calculations
  • Crane Inspection Parameter
  • Wire Rope guidelines and inspection
  • Standard Hand Signals
  • Load Chart specifics
  • Hand Signals
  • Safety standards wisdom
Dangerous Goods Storage Defensive Driving Training
Defensive Driving 

Course Objectives

The Defensive Driving Course is an established, proven program. The participants will learn lifelong safe

driving habits through this course. The three-part Collision Prevention Formula will show drivers how to

recognize the hazard, understand the defense and act in time. The participants will learn the principles of:

• Defensive driving

• Collision avoidance techniques

• The six adverse driving conditions

• The time-interval formula

• The habitual eye-lead tie technique

• The pre-trip mental inventory

Who Should Attend?

• Professional Drivers

• Drivers wanting to refresh their driving skills

Course Outline

• Defensive driving principles and foundations

• Avoiding collisions with the driver ahead and behind

• How to avoid collisions while passing, while being passed

• Avoiding collisions at intersections

• Avoiding single vehicle collisions

• Sharing the road with other road users

Egress & Emergency Plans
Is your agency prepared for a workplace emergency? Does your agency have an Emergency Action Plan (EAP) in place? Do your employees know escape routes and the locations of fire extinguishers and first aid kits?

Since the events of Sept. 11, 2001, these questions have been on the minds of people all over the United States. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has taken steps to clarify and define what is required under “Means of Egress and Emergency Action Plan,” Subpart E

Agencies are required to train a sufficient number of individuals to help assist with evacuation procedures. “Written procedures should be reviewed with all employees upon implementation of the plan, when employee responsibilities change or if there is a revision to the plan itself. The standard also requires that a sufficient number of adequately trained personnel be available at the agency at all times during business hours.” (Preparing for Workplace Emergencies, 2001). And remember: If training is not reinforced it will be forgotten. Consider retraining employees annually

Course objectives:

      • Define key terms
      • Discuss general requirements
      • Discuss Means of Egress
      • Discuss employee emergency plans and fire prevention plans
Ergonomics
This topic covers ergonomics, or the science of fitting a job to the worker performing that job. Ergonomic hazards include repetitive stress injuries, carpal tunnel syndrome, and other musculosketal disorders (MSDs).

The goal of ergonomics is to reduce a worker’s exposure to MSD risk factors by changing the design of a workstation or the way a job is performed, allowing workers to rotate through different jobs, or providing personal protective equipment (PPE). Although there is currently no specific OSHA standard for ergonomics, employers have a duty to address ergonomic issues under the General Duty Clause of the Occupational Safety and Health Act.

Elevator Safety
  • This training addresses electrical safety requirements that are necessary for the practical safeguarding of employees in their workplaces and is divided into four major divisions as follows:
  • Design safety standards for electrical systems. These regulations are contained in 1910.302 through 1910.330. Sections 1910.302 through 1910.308 contain design safety standards for electric utilization systems. Included in this category are all electric equipment and installations used to provide electric power and light for employee workplaces. Sections 1910.309 through 1910.330 are reserved for possible future design safety standards for other electrical systems.
  • Safety-related work practices. These regulations will be contained in 1910.331 through 1910.360.
  • Safety-related maintenance requirements. These regulations will be contained in 1910.361 through 1910.380.
  • Safety requirements for special equipment. These regulations will be contained in 1910.381 through 1910.398.
Electrical Safety (General)

This course is for those who are exposed to electrical hazards, either directly or indirectly, but have not qualified as a skilled electrical worker. NFPA 70E defines this person as an “unqualified” person because they are exposed to electrical hazards due to the nature of their jobs.

Those attending will gain a greater awareness of policies, procedures and communication skills related to electrical safety.

Electrical Safety for Non-Electrical Skilled Worker

This course is for those who are exposed to electrical hazards, either directly or indirectly, but have not qualified as a skilled electrical worker. NFPA 70E defines this person as an “unqualified” person because they are exposed to electrical hazards due to the nature of their jobs.

 

Those attending will gain a greater awareness of policies, procedures and communication skills related to electrical safety.

Excavation Competent Person Training
The following topics are covered in this Excavation Competent Person training course:
• Definitions of Key Terms Used in the OSHA Excavation Standards
• OSHA Requirements for a Competent Person
• General Hazards Associated with Trenching and Excavation Work
• Requirements for Locating and Working Near Underground Utilities (Federal and State)
• Dangers Associated with Water Accumulation
• Access and Egress from Trenches and Excavations
• Exposure to Vehicular Traffic
• Identifying and Addressing Potential Atmospheric Hazards Associated with Excavation Work
• Soil Testing and Classification
• Requirements for Protective Systems
o Sloping and Benching
o Shoring
o Trench Boxes
• Competent Person Inspection Requirements
• OSHA Directives and Interpretations Related to Trenching and Excavation
• OSHA Inspections at Excavation Sites
Excavation Safety for Residential Construction

Evacuation Safety (Residential) Outline

This training will help small, low-hazard service or small business to implement safe site excavations for residential properties, and comply with OSHA’s excavation standards.

Course objectives:

  • Intro to OSHA Excavations?
  • Residential vs. Commercial excavations?
  • Dig Safe on Residential property?
  • How to comply with state rules on open excavations?
  • Emergency Response Procedures for Excavations?

 

Eye and Face Protection

A Regulations: 29 CFR 1910.133 1.

 

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Protects You from Workplace Hazards

  1. OSHA requires employers to identify when workers need PPE as protection and:
  2. Select PPE that will protect employees from identified hazards
  3. Train employees to know when and how to select, use, and care for the PPE

 

Goals: This safety session will teach participants to:

  1. Understand which hazards require eye protection.
  2. Know how to select, use, and maintain eye protection correctly

 

Fall Protection
Employers must provide a training program that teaches employees who might be exposed to fall hazards how to recognize such hazards and how to minimize them. Employees must be trained in the following areas: (a) the nature of fall hazards in the work area; (b) the correct procedures for erecting, maintaining, disassembling, and inspecting fall protection systems; (c) the use and operation of controlled access zones and guardrail, personal fall arrest, safety net, warning line, and safety monitoring systems; (d) the role of each employee in the safety monitoring system when the system is in use; (e) the limitations on the use of mechanical equipment during the performance of roofing work on low-sloped roofs; (f) the correct procedures for equipment and materials handling and storage and the erection of overhead protection; and, (g) employees’ role in fall protection plans.
Employers must prepare a written certification that identifies the employee trained and the date of the training. The employer or trainer must sign the certification record. Retraining also must be provided when necessary.

      • ·         INTRODUCTION
      • SCOPE AND APPLICATION
      • ·         PROVISIONS OF THE STANDARD
      • ·         DUTY TO HAVE FALL PROTECTION
      • ·         Controlled Access Zones
      • ·         Excavations
      • ·         Formwork and Reinforcing Steel
      • ·         Hoist Areas
      • ·         Holes
      • ·         Leading Edges
      • ·         Overhand Bricklaying and Related Work
      • ·         Precast Concrete Erection and Residential Construction
      • ·         Ramps, Runways, and Other Walkways
      • ·         Roofing
        • o   Low-slope Roofs
        • o   Steep Roofs
      • ·         Wall Openings
      • ·         Guardrail Systems
      • ·         Personal Fall Arrest Systems
      • ·         Positioning Device Systems
      • ·         Safety Monitoring Systems
      • ·         Safety Net Systems
      • ·         Warning Line Systems
      • ·         Covers
      • ·         PROTECTION FROM FALLING OBJECTS.
Fall Protection/Competent Person
Overview of Fall Prevention and Protection (COMPETENT PERSON (CP))
• The Need for Fall Protection (CP Specific)
• Hazard Analysis (CP)
• Recognition of hazards (CP)
• Evaluation fall hazard criteria vs. work criteria (CP)
• Control measures (CP)
• Fall Prevention vs. Protection (CP)
• General Principles of Fall Protection (ALL)
• Fall clearance calculations (CP)
• Total fall distance calculations (CP)
Personal Fall Arrest Systems (Hands-on exercises)
• Inspection procedures (ALL)
• Donning procedures (ALL)
• Fit test PPE (ALL)
• Selection, application and care of equipment (ALL)
• Fall Protection on Aerial Lifts and Ladders (ALL)
• Rescue (ALL)
• Fall victim care (ALL)
• First on the scene (ALL)
• Self-rescue and assisted self-rescue (ALL)
• Fall Hazard Task Evaluation (Exercise requiring hazard analysis) (ALL)
Fall Protection on High Walls
(29CFR1910Subpart(D), 29CFR1926Subpart (M)).OSHA is committed to providing you a safe and healthy workplace. This program is just one piece of the Fall Protection Program  to teach, train and protect you from fall hazards. OSHA’s regulations require certain steps to be taken to protect you from fall hazards. This program will discuss those required steps.  There are numerous fall hazards and potential fall hazards. The most common are cluttered work areas, wet floors, inattentiveness, floor and wall openings, holes, ramps, runways, protruding nails, loose boards and working at heights. OSHA requires protection for employees working at heights of four feet in general industry and six feet in construction. Employees must be protected from falling into dangerous equipment regardless of height.
Farm Safety Fiber Awareness
This course will cover the following material:

      • Hazardous fibers, like Asbestos, Ceramic fibers, Man Made Mineral Fibers, Cristobalite & Tridymite
      • Hazardous materials
      • Demolition
      • Asbestos removal
      • Industrial Hygiene
      • Occupational Health & Safety
      • (Industrial) Air Emissions

Fire Risk & Safety

Flammable & Combustible Liquids (Storage / Hazards
This course will cover the following:

      • PVC Glue and Primer
      • Chemical HAZCOM
      • Chemical Storage Safety
      • Chemical Transportation Safety
      • Chemical use Safety
      • Disposal Considerations 
Food Safety (Awareness) Foot Protection
This topic covers OSHA’s regulations for employee foot protection, which are a subset of its personal protective equipment (PPE) requirements.

OSHA requires protective footwear whenever employees are exposed to foot injury risks from falling or rolling objects, objects piercing the sole, or electrical hazards. Foot PPE typically includes protective toes (for protection from impact and compression hazards), puncture-resistant soles (for protection from sharp protruding objects), and/or insulated nonconductive material (for protection against electrical hazards). It is the employer’s responsibility to determine the hazards to which workers are exposed and select appropriate PPE.

Course Objectives:

      • Understand the OSHA Standard for foot protection
      • Who needs foot protection
      • Causes of foot problems
      • How does flooring contribute to foot problems
      • How does footwear contribute to the foot problems
      • Workplace foot injuries
      • Prevention
      • What to know when purchasing footwear
Fork Truck/Powered Industrial Trucks HAZCOM GHS Global Harmonization System
This course is intended to provide basic information on the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS). This course is intended for individuals having little to no experience with GHS, but expected to encounter Safety Data Sheets (SDS) and Labels prepared according to GHS in their workplace.

Students will learn about hazard communication tools, such as SDS and labels, and about what GHS is and how it will affect them in the workplace. Emphasis will be placed on interpretation of labels and label elements, including GHS symbols, signal words, hazard statements, and precautionary statements.

This course is intended to fulfill the training provisions set by the OSHA Hazard Communication Standard 29 CFR 1910.1200 that employees of manufacturers/importers must be trained on GHS by December 1, 2013.

      • Introduction
        • Who?
        • What?
        • Where?
        • When?
        • Why?
      • GHS Hazard Classes and Categories
        • Physical Hazards
        • Health Hazards
        • (Environmental Hazards)
      • GHS Label Elements
        • Signal Words
        • Building Blocks
        • Labels
          • Labelling for Supply
          • Labelling for Transprt
        • Symbols
        • Hazard Statements
        • Precautionary Statements
      • GHS Format for Safety Data Sheets
        • 16 Section Review
      • Other Labeling Systems
        • HMIS
        • NFPA
Global Harmonization Systems (GHS Hazard Communications Global Harmonization Systems (GHS) Hazard Communications (Supervisors) Hazardous Materials Storage
Hazardous Materials Storage Training is for anyone who works with and stores Hazardous Materials.
Hazardous Materials Labeling
Hazardous Material Labeling

A critical step in the safe handling of a hazards is labeling and marking all containers and hazards accordingly. This course is designed to teach each employer and employee the following.

Course Objective

      • Hazard labeling introduction
      • Identify appropriate Hazard labels
      • Use of Color Labels
      • Proper labeling under different circumstances and differences between storage and shipping labeling 
Hearing Conservation

 

  • Introduction to hearing conservation
  • Employers responsibly
  • How the ear works
  • Basics of sound travel
  • Sound monitoring
  • Introduction to hearing protection
  • Choosing the right hearing protection (Sizing)
  • Care and maintenance of hearing protection
  • Sound monitoring

 

Heavy Equipment Safety
  • Proper methods of fueling, maintenance, and lubrication as required by the manufacturer
  • Pre-start procedures, which include proper safety checks
  • Starting and warming up the machine
  • Proper operational procedures, which include use of all controls
  • Demonstration of travel maneuvers necessary for the types of terrain they will encounter
  • Proper hook-up of equipment and attachments that may be used with the machine
  • Operation of the equipment with various attachments
  • Proper shut-down procedures
  • Proper transportation and load securement procedures
  • Proper personal protective equipment
Mass Hoisting
Massachusetts Hoisting Engineer License Prep Class is for workers needed to acquire the Massachusetts Certification to operate hoisting equipment.

Hoisting License 1C / 1D Training

The DPS regulations dictate that employees who operate certain types of equipment receive training and certification on that equipment.  The 1C / 1D Hoisting Engineer Training covers items needed to pass the state exam and to cover refresher CEU’s (Continuing Education Units) for those who already possess the above mentioned hoisting engineer classification.  Open enrollment courses are listed in the calendar section.

Course Agenda:

      • Massachusetts / OSHA
      • Mass General Law 146
      • Code of Massachusetts Regulations 6.00
      • Code of Massachusetts Regulations 14.00
      • OSHA 29CFR 1926
      • OSHA 29CFR 1910
      • ANSI B30
      • Massachusetts General Law 82 sec,40
      • Massachusetts General Law 82A
      • Massachusetts General Law 164 sec,76D

Hoisting License 2A, 2B, 2C, 2D Training

The DPS regulations dictate that employees who operate certain types of equipment receive training and certification on that equipment.  The 2A Hoisting Engineer Training covers items needed to pass the state exam and to cover refresher CEU’s (Continuing Education Units) for those who already possess the above mentioned hoisting engineer classification.  Open enrollment courses are listed in the calendar section.

 Course Agenda:

      • Massachusetts / OSHA
      • Mass General Law 146
      • Code of Massachusetts Regulations 6.00
      • Code of Massachusetts Regulations 14.00
      • OSHA 29CFR 1926
      • Massachusetts General Law 82 sec,40
      • Massachusetts General Law 82A
      • Massachusetts General Law 164 sec,76D
      • Code of Massachusetts Regulations 99.00 (Dig Safe)

Hoisting License 3A Training

 This course is a prerequisite for the 3A Hoist exam. This is an approved DPS program authorized to issue 4 CEU’s, where applicable.

Course Agenda:

      • Proper crane setup
      • Jobsite safety
      • Crane component recognition
      • Introduction to Hydraulic / Mechanical Advantage Theory
      • Load weight and load bearing calculations
      • Crane Inspection Parameter
      • Wire Rope guidelines and inspection
      • Standard Hand Signals
      • Load Chart specifics
      • Hand Signals
      • Safety standards wisdom
Hoist /Crane Safety
Hoisting License 1C / 1D Training

The DPS regulations dictate that employees who operate certain types of equipment receive training and certification on that equipment.  The 1C / 1D Hoisting Engineer Training covers items needed to pass the state exam and to cover refresher CEU’s (Continuing Education Units) for those who already possess the above mentioned hoisting engineer classification.  Open enrollment courses are listed in the calendar section.

Course Agenda:

      • Massachusetts / OSHA
      • Mass General Law 146
      • Code of Massachusetts Regulations 6.00
      • Code of Massachusetts Regulations 14.00
      • OSHA 29CFR 1926
      • OSHA 29CFR 1910
      • ANSI B30
      • Massachusetts General Law 82 sec,40
      • Massachusetts General Law 82A
      • Massachusetts General Law 164 sec,76D

Hoisting License 2A, 2B, 2C, 2D Training

The DPS regulations dictate that employees who operate certain types of equipment receive training and certification on that equipment.  The 2A Hoisting Engineer Training covers items needed to pass the state exam and to cover refresher CEU’s (Continuing Education Units) for those who already possess the above mentioned hoisting engineer classification.  Open enrollment courses are listed in the calendar section.

Course Agenda:

      • Massachusetts / OSHA
      • Mass General Law 146
      • Code of Massachusetts Regulations 6.00
      • Code of Massachusetts Regulations 14.00
      • OSHA 29CFR 1926
      • Massachusetts General Law 82 sec,40
      • Massachusetts General Law 82A
      • Massachusetts General Law 164 sec,76D
      • Code of Massachusetts Regulations 99.00 (Dig Safe)

Hoisting License 3A Training

This course is a prerequisite for the 3A Hoist exam. This is an approved DPS program authorized to issue 4 CEU’s, where applicable.  

Course Agenda:

      • Proper crane setup
      • Jobsite safety
      • Crane component recognition
      • Introduction to Hydraulic / Mechanical Advantage Theory
      • Load weight and load bearing calculations
      • Crane Inspection Parameter
      • Wire Rope guidelines and inspection
      • Standard Hand Signals
      • Load Chart specifics
      • Hand Signals
      • Safety standards wisdom
Hot Work

Hot work is any process that can be a source of ignition when flammable material is present or can be a fire hazard regardless of the presence of flammable material in the workplace. Working with ignition sources near flammable materials is referred to as “hot work.” Welding, soldering, cutting and brazing are examples of hot work. Fires are often the result of the “quick five minute” job in areas not intended for welding or cutting. Getting a hot work permit before performing hot work is just one of steps involved in a hot work management program that helps to reduce the risk of starting a fire by welding or cutting in areas where there are flammable or combustible materials.

 

Training May include:

 

  • The role of the permit issuer
  • The 35-foot rule
  • Equipment requirements
  • PPE requirements
  • Elevated hot work
  • Material considerations
  • Posting the permit
Handling Radioactive Materials Packages Industrial Truck

This program will focus on three areas of concern that must be addressed. Sections A through K address requirements for the workplace, while Section L addresses operator training, and Sections M through Q address worker safety. Here TIGER Training will outline the areas that should be addressed in the operation of powered industrial trucks and the training requirements for operators.

Training May include:

  • Operating instructions, warnings, and precautions for the types of truck the operator will be authorized to operate.
  • Differences between the truck and the automobile.
  • Truck controls and instrumentation: where they are located, what they do, and how they work.
  • Engine or motor operation.
  • Steering and maneuvering.
  • Visibility (including restrictions due to loading).
  • Fork and attachment adaptation, operation, and use limitations.
  • Vehicle capacity.
  • Vehicle stability.
  • Any vehicle inspection and maintenance that the operator will be required to perform.
  • Refueling and/or charging and recharging of batteries.

Operating limitations.

Course Duration: 4 Hours

Training will include Video, group discussion and hands on practice

Job Safety Analysis
A Job Safety Analysis (JSA) is a highly effective tool used to examine and establish the safest way to complete a work task. The term JSA is often used interchangeably with Job Hazard Analysis (JHA).

This hands-on course is essential for employees who are involved in applying basic risk control processes. Anyone who contributes to the creation of a Job Safety Analysis for tasks in the workplace will benefit from this training.

Course objectives:

      • Identify hazards
      • Assess risk and identify unacceptable risk
      • Identify, assess and implement risk treatment
      • Complete records and reports
Job Hazard Analysis Lab Safety - Chemical Hygiene
This 4 hour program will cover basic concepts established under the protocols of industrial hygiene and hygienic chemical practices. The course is intended for students and workers who work with and potentially be exposed to chemicals in a laboratory or general industrial setting.

This complies with OSHA standard 29CFR1910.1450

      • Lab Safety Basic
      • Fume Hood Operations
      • BL (1, 2, 3, 4) Lab Levels
      • Chemical Storage Segregation
      • Incidental Spill Cleanup
      • Chemical Exposure Control
      • Safety Shower Usage
      • Eye Wash Station Usage
      • Monitoring
      • Chemical Hygiene Program Elements
Laboratory Safety-Biological Ladder Safety

Some workers ask: “Why do I have to be qualified to use a ladder? I can just throw it against a building and climb up; what’s the big deal?” Falling is the big deal. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics 1994 Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries, 8.8 percent of occupational deaths are related to falling. Falling isn’t the only hazard involved with using a ladder. Lifting the ladder itself also is a major cause of injuries. Using improper technique while lifting a ladder can lead to lower back injuries so severe that they may cause an employee to miss work or even suffer a lifetime of pain. Maneuvering a 100-pound ladder off a truck and through a typical yard, around obstacles such as lawn chairs and toys, can be challenging to say the least. Anyone who works with a ladder should be able to answer all of the following:

      • How to inspect a ladder
      • How to survey the area
      • How to lift a ladder properly
      • How to determine where the balance points are
      • How to properly set-up a ladder
      • How to properly climb a ladder
      • How to secure one’s body while working
      • How to work properly
Laser Safety

This course will cover the following material:

      • Laser Beam Properties
      • Types of LASERS
      • LASER Safety Glasses
      • Biological Effects
      • Safety Standard and Health & Safety Guidance
      • Preparing Risk Assessments
      • Laser Hazards
      • Legal Requirements
      • Maximum Permissible Exposure (MPE) and Exposure
      • Limit Values (ELVs)
Lead Hazard Training Lifting and Back Safety Lockout/Tagout (LOTO)
Workers performing service or maintenance on machinery and equipment may be exposed to injuries from the unexpected energization, startup of the machinery or equipment, or release of stored energy in the equipment.

The Lockout/Tagout standard requires the adoption and implementation of practices and procedures to shut down equipment, isolate it from its energy source(s), and prevent the release of potentially hazardous energy while maintenance and servicing activities are being performed. It contains minimum performance requirements, and definitive criteria for establishing an effective program for the control of hazardous energy. However, employers have the flexibility to develop lockout/tagout programs that are suitable for their respective facilities.

Logger Safety Machine Guarding

Moving machine parts have the potential to cause severe workplace injuries, such as crushed fingers or hands, amputations, burns, or blindness. Safeguards are essential for protecting workers from these preventable injuries. Any machine part, function, or process that may cause injury must be safeguarded. When the operations of a machine or accidental contact injure the operator or others in the vicinity, the hazards must be eliminated or controlled. This course contains general information on the various hazards of mechanical motion and techniques for protecting workers.

Course objectives:

      • Explain the importance of machine guarding.
      • Match the types of mechanical components with their descriptions.
      • Match the types of mechanical motion with their descriptions.
      • Match the types of machine actions with their descriptions.
      • Describe the benefits of creating categories of machine activities.
      • Identify requirements of OSHA’s machine guarding standard.
      • Distinguish between machine guards and safeguarding devices.
      • Match the types of machine guards with their descriptions.
      • Match the types of safeguarding devices with their descriptions.
      • Describe how foot controls differ from many other types of controls.
      • Identify examples of safeguarding by location.
      • Identify methods of safeguarding by feeding and ejection.
      • Describe the purpose of lockout/tagout in relation to machine guarding.
      • Describe the role of training in machine guarding.
Means of Egress and Emergency Plans (OSHA Subpart E)
Is your agency prepared for a workplace emergency? Does your agency have an Emergency Action Plan (EAP) in place? Do your employees know escape routes and the locations of fire extinguishers and first aid kits?

Since the events of Sept. 11, 2001, these questions have been on the minds of people all over the United States. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has taken steps to clarify and define what is required under “Means of Egress and Emergency Action Plan,” Subpart E

Agencies are required to train a sufficient number of individuals to help assist with evacuation procedures. “Written procedures should be reviewed with all employees upon implementation of the plan, when employee responsibilities change or if there is a revision to the plan itself. The standard also requires that a sufficient number of adequately trained personnel be available at the agency at all times during business hours.” (Preparing for Workplace Emergencies, 2001). And remember: If training is not reinforced it will be forgotten. Consider retraining employees annually

Course objectives:

      • Define key terms
      • Discuss general requirements
      • Discuss Means of Egress
      • Discuss employee emergency plans and fire prevention plans
Motor Vehicle Safety
This course will cover…

      • Driving and Avoiding Roadway Crashes
      • Driving and Being Prepared Checklist
      • Driving and Being Road-Wise
      • Driving and Merging Collision Prevention
      • Driving and Tailgating
      • Driving and Using Cellular Phones Safety Training Program
      • Driving Distractions
      • Driving Fatigue Prevention
      • Driving in Highway Construction Zones – Take 5 for Safety
      • Driving in the Fog
      • Driving in the Rain
      • Driving in the Winter
      • Driving with Antilock Brake Systems (ABS) Safety Tips
Motor Cycle Safety NFPA 70E Arc Flash Arc Blast

1) OSHA Rules & Regulations Under 29CFR1910 Subpart S (General Industry) & 29CFR1926 Subpart K (Construction Standard) and the NFPA 2015 Arc Flash Arc Blast Standards

 

2) Training

  1. a) Identifying Hazards
  2. b) Job Briefings,
  3. c) Live Work Defined
  4. d) Live Work Permits

 

3) Working on/Near Exposed Energized Parts

  1. a) Minimum Approach Distance Protective Action Zones (New Zones 2015)
  2. b) Insulation of Equipment Electrical Connections, (No Exception of New NEC 2014)
  3. c) Apparel APF, PPE (New Levels for 2015)
  4. d) NFPA 70E in Relation to OSHA Lockout Tagout 29CFR1910.147

 

4) Arc Flash Awareness & Guidelines De-energizing

  1. a) Equipment Grounding
  2. b) Testing Electrical Equipment
  3. c) Guarding
  4. d) Special Conditions

 

5) Electrical Diagnostic Testing Exemptions (NFPA Work Permit Needed or Not)

 

6) Trouble Shooting Electrical Systems

[

 

/expand] Personal Protection Equipment (PPE)Personal Protective Equipment training is important because the proper use of specialized clothing and work accessories can prevent injuries in the workplace. It is important for employers to be committed to establishing proper safety practices and providing a safe work environment.
The goal of this course is to help employers reduce their employees’ exposure to workplace hazards and protect them from serious injury by learning how to properly use Personal Protective Equipment (PPE).
Course objectives:

      • Introduction and Definition of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
      • Hazard Assessment
      • Personal Protective Equipment Selection
      • Elements of proper PPE training
      • Primary types of PPE:
      • Eye and Face Protection
      • Head Protection
      • Hand Protection
      • Foot Protection
      • Hearing Protection
      • Respirators Basic (Requires Annual Refresher)
      • Protective Clothing
      • Your company’s policies on PPE use in the workplace
      • Quiz
Pesticide Safety

 

This course provides thorough education in areas pertaining to pesticide safety including pesticide toxicity, measuring toxicity, forms of pesticide entry into the body, symptoms of pesticide exposure, and applicator safety precautions. In addition, safe use, storage and handling of pesticides.

 

Customer will need to provide list of pesticides used.

Office Safety Oil Gas Field Safety
This Course will cover the Following Material:

      • Vehicle Accidents
      • Struck-By/ Caught-In/ Caught-Between
      • Explosions and Fires
      • Falls
      • Confined Spaces
      • Chemical Exposures
Power Distribution Awareness PPE SCBA (Self Contained Breathing Apparatus)
Course Outline: The Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus, SCBA training course is designed for wearers that are required to undertake operational duties in potentially harmful environments. Examples include maintenance work in ammonia atmospheres, chlorine cylinder change outs and waste water and other non-respirable environments. The program is designed for those who may have to don SCBA for use in, or escape from, non-respirable atmospheres. It is designed for employers, employees and contractors from all industrial sectors. The course is tailored to the attendees on the day in relation to their worksites and workplace activities.

Course Subjects

  • Conduct pre-donning checks and tests on breathing apparatus
  • Don and check breathing apparatus
  • Operate breathing apparatus
  • Conclude operations
    1. Hazardous environments that require respiratory protection
    2. Relevant Australian Standards, Regulations
    3. Types of Breathing Apparatus
    4. Communication Procedures
    5. Breathing Apparatus components parts
    6. Calculating working duration & Emergency escape times
    7. Using Breathing Apparatus Control Tally Boards
    8. Breathing Apparatus Safety & Entrapment Procedures
    9. After Use Cleaning, Maintenance & Testing Procedures

Participants will complete practical scenario’s/exercises based on the elements in this unit of competency and tailored to your needs for your workplace and may include: Firefighting, Search & Rescue, Chemical Splash Suits & Decontamination, etc.

Course Duration: 8 hours

Training includes PPT Presentation, Handout and Certificates and practical exercise

Radiation Safety Awareness Radiation Safety in the Workplace (Handling Radioactive Medicines)
Railroad Safety Recording, Reporting, Record Keeping-OSHA Regulated Substances Respiratory Protection W/(Fit Test)

Respiratory protection training is mandatory for any worker who is required to wear a respirator. Respirators are an effective method of protection against designated hazards when properly selected and worn. Respirator use is encouraged, even when exposures are below the exposure limit, to provide an additional level of comfort and protection for workers. However, if a respirator is used improperly or not kept clean, the respirator itself can become a hazard to the worker. Sometimes, workers may wear respirators to avoid exposures to hazards, even if the amount of hazardous substance does not exceed the limits set by OSHA standards. If your employer provides respirators for your voluntary use, or if you provide your own respirator, you need to take certain precautions to be sure that the respirator itself does not present a hazard.

Fit testing is required for mandatory use of all tight-fitting facepieces and recommended for voluntary use. OSHA 1910.134(f) states: “The employer shall ensure that an employee using a tight-fitting facepiece respirator is fit tested prior to initial use of the respirator, whenever a different respirator facepiece (size, style, model or make) is used, and at least annually thereafter. Learning and remembering the knowledge and skills you need to use your respirator correctly will help ensure that your respirator protects you.

Training may include the following:

  • Why you need to use the respirator
  • What the respirator can and cannot do to protect you
  • How to properly inspect, put on and take off, and use your respirator
  • How to check the seal of your respirator (also called a “user seal check”)
  • How to use the respirator effectively in emergency situations, including situations in which the respirator doesn’t work properly
  • How to recognize medical signs and symptoms that may limit or prevent you from using a respirator
  • How improper fit, usage, or maintenance can reduce your respirator’s ability to protect you
  • What the procedures are for maintenance and storage of the respirator; and
  • What the requirements are for federal OSHA’s or your State OSHA’s Respiratory Protection Standards.

Duration of course: 4 hours

Training includes fit test, PPT presentation, handouts and certificates.

Rigging Safety
This Course will cover the following material:

      • Slings & Rigging
      • Hardware Identification & Inspection
      • Rigging Equipment Capacities
      • Sling Hitches & Capacities
      • Hitch Configurations
      • Sling Angles & Tensions
      • Load Weight Estimation
      • Center of Gravity
      • Sling Protection
      • Knots & Tagline
      • Use Chain Fall
      • Drifting Load
      • Turning Winches & Blocks
Roadside Worker Safety
  • Work Health and Safety duties
  • Risk management
  • PPE
  • Traffic management planning
  • Signage and positioning
  • Role of Traffic Controllers
  • Incident reporting
Scaffolding Safety Scissor Lifts Shop Safety
This course will cover the following:

      • Basic Tool Safety
      • Pneumatic Tool Safety
      • Electric Tool Safety
      • Impact Tool Safety
      • Gas Operated Tool Safety
      • Machine Tool Safety
      • Tool Storage Consideration 5S
      • Tool Care and Maintenance
      • Ergonomics
Slips, Trips and Falls
This Course will cover the following material:

      • Unsafe ladders
      • Unsafe stairs
      • Obstruction in walkways or on stairs
      • Slippery or uneven surfaces
      • Improper shoes
      • Moving too fast
      • Poor lighting
      • Being tired or distracted
Supervisor Responsibility for Workplace Safety
This course will cover the following:

      • Jobsite Safety Considerations
      • Employee Selection Criteria
      • Employee Health Consideration
      • Transportation Safety
      • Job Task Safety
Tractor Safety Traffic Flagger Awareness UV Radiation Training
Ultraviolet (UV) rays are a part of sunlight that is an invisible form of radiation. UV rays can penetrate and change the structure of skin cells. There are three types of UV rays: ultraviolet A (UVA), ultraviolet B (UVB), and ultraviolet C (UVC). UVA is the most abundant source of solar radiation at the earth’s surface and penetrates beyond the top layer of human skin.

Training Topics to be covered:

      • Definition of UV Radiation
      • Biological Hazards of UV Radiation
      • Sources of UV Radiation in the Workplace
      • Safety Measures
      • Administrative Practices
Ventilation Safety Walking Working Surfaces Warehouse Safety
Warehouse Safety

Objectives

To explain common potential warehouse hazards and the safety precautions and procedures that

are important to warehouse safety. The result should be closer attention to equipment and tasks

that could cause accidents, more effort to follow safety rules, and fewer accidents and near misses

in the warehouse

Introduction/Overview

A safe, orderly, efficient warehouse is a key to a successful operation. The warehouse plays an

essential role in the way goods are sent, received, stored, and circulated throughout the facility.

With so much going on and so much to keep track of, a warehouse may also have more potential

for accidents than areas with more limited functions. So it’s especially important to pay close

attention to safety in the warehouse.

Today, we’re going to review some of the potential warehouse hazards and ways we reduce

risks. There are so many areas to cover that we can’t cover every single detail on each one. The

purpose of this safety meeting is to get you to look at the warehouse with safety in mind—so that

you’ll always be alert to the hazards and always do what’s necessary to prevent accidents.

      • General Hazards
      • OSHA Regulations
      • Identifying Hazards
      • Housekeeping Hazards
      • Material Handling Hazards
      • Protection Against Hazards
      • Material Handling Protections
      • Safe Lifting
      • Ladder Safety
      • Loading Dock Safety
      • Safety Procedures
      • Safe Storage Practices
      • Packing and Unpacking
      • Preventing Falling Objects
      • Personal Protective Clothing
      • Safety Attitude
Welding Safety
This program is designed to explain health hazards in welding operations and how to make the job safer and healthful by following industry safety and health procedures. We will discuss the two most common types of welding and cutting (gas and arc), the danger that are involved in working with them and the safety measure that can be undertaken to minimize and prevent the occurrence of their associated hazards. The course goes on to study fire prevention techniques and the danger of preservative coatings when welding or cutting. The course goes on to study fire prevention techniques and the danger of preservative coatings when welding or cutting.

 

This course covers the following topics:

      • Importance of Effective Safety and Health Programs
      • Common Characteristics of Exemplary Workplaces
      • The Guidelines – General
      • Major Elements
      • Be able to differentiate between the standards for gas and arc welding and cutting
      • Know the various fire prevention methods Understand the need and methods of ventilation
      • Know the dangers of preservative coating and how to minimize them
Winter Driving Safety
Winter driving can be hazardous and scary, especially in northern regions that get a lot of snow and ice. Additional preparations can help make a trip safer, or help motorists deal with an emergency.

Course objectives:

      • Storm Predictions
      • Storm Prep Gas & Diesel Vehicles
      • Basic Supplies for Emergencies
      • Vehicle Operation
      • Tires 101
      • Driver Ed

SPECIFIC CHEMICAL SAFETY & RESPONSE

Chlorine, Cadmium, Chromium, Lead, Acids, Alkalines….etc.